e10vq
Table of Contents

 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-Q
     
þ   Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2010
Commission File Number: 001-34084
POPULAR, INC.
 
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
     
Puerto Rico   66-0667416
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (IRS Employer Identification Number)
     
Popular Center Building    
209 Muñoz Rivera Avenue, Hato Rey    
San Juan, Puerto Rico   00918
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip code)
(787) 765-9800
 
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
NOT APPLICABLE
 
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
þ Yes                    o No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
þ Yes                    o No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “accelerated filer, large accelerated filer and smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:
Large accelerated filer þ Accelerated filer o  Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
o Yes                    þ No
Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: Common Stock $0.01 par value, 1,022,682,796 shares outstanding as of November 2, 2010.
 
 

 


 

POPULAR, INC.
INDEX
         
  Page
Part I — Financial Information
   
 
       
       
 
       
    4  
 
       
    5  
 
       
    6  
 
       
    8  
 
       
    9  
 
       
    11  
 
       
    91  
 
       
    148  
 
       
    156  
 
       
       
 
       
    156  
 
       
    158  
 
       
    160  
 
       
    161  
 
       
    162  
 EX-10.1
 EX-12.1
 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-32.1
 EX-32.2
 EX-101 INSTANCE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 SCHEMA DOCUMENT
 EX-101 CALCULATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 LABELS LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 PRESENTATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 DEFINITION LINKBASE DOCUMENT


Table of Contents

Forward-Looking Information
The information included in this Form 10-Q contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements may relate to Popular, Inc.’s (the “Corporation”) financial condition, results of operations, plans, objectives, future performance and business, including, but not limited to, statements with respect to the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses, market risk and the impact of interest rate changes, capital markets conditions, capital adequacy and liquidity, and the effect of legal proceedings and new accounting standards on the Corporation’s financial condition and results of operations. All statements contained herein that are not clearly historical in nature are forward-looking, and the words “anticipate,” “believe,” “continues,” “expect,” “estimate,” “intend,” “project” and similar expressions and future or conditional verbs such as “will,” “would,” “should,” “could,” “might,” “can,” “may,” or similar expressions are generally intended to identify forward-looking statements.
These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve certain risks, uncertainties, estimates and assumptions by management that are difficult to predict.
Various factors, some of which are beyond Popular’s control, could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, such forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause such a difference include, but are not limited to:
    the rate of growth in the economy and employment levels, as well as general business and economic conditions;
 
    difficulties in combining the operations of acquired entities, including in connection with our acquisition of certain assets and assumption of certain liabilities of Westernbank Puerto Rico from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”);
 
    changes in interest rates, as well as the magnitude of such changes;
 
    the fiscal and monetary policies of the federal government and its agencies;
 
    changes in federal bank regulatory and supervisory policies, including required levels of capital;
 
    the impact of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Financial Reform Act) on the Corporation’s businesses, business practices and costs of operations;
 
    the relative strength or weakness of the consumer and commercial credit sectors and of the real estate markets in Puerto Rico and the other markets in which borrowers are located;
 
    the performance of the stock and bond markets;
 
    competition in the financial services industry;
 
    additional FDIC assessments; and
 
    possible legislative, tax or regulatory changes.
Investors should refer to the Corporation’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009 as well as “Part II, Item 1A” of this Form 10-Q for a discussion of such factors and certain risks and uncertainties to which the Corporation is subject.
Moreover, the outcome of legal proceedings, as discussed in “Part II, Item I. Legal Proceedings,” is inherently uncertain and depends on judicial interpretations of law and the findings of regulators, judges and juries.
All forward-looking statements included in this document are based upon information available to the Corporation as of the date of this document, and other than as required by law, including the requirements of applicable securities laws, we assume no obligation to update or revise any such forward-looking statements to reflect occurrences or unanticipated events or circumstances after the date of such statements.

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ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
POPULAR, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CONDITION(UNAUDITED)
                         
    September 30,     December 31,     September 30,  
(In thousands, except share information)   2010     2009     2009  
 
ASSETS
                       
Cash and due from banks
  $ 580,811     $ 677,330     $ 606,861  
 
Money market investments:
                       
Federal funds sold
          159,807       140,635  
Securities purchased under agreements to resell
    290,456       293,125       325,178  
Time deposits with other banks
    1,733,493       549,865       633,010  
 
Total money market investments
    2,023,949       1,002,797       1,098,823  
 
Trading account securities, at fair value:
                       
Pledged securities with creditors’ right to repledge
    434,637       415,653       386,478  
Other trading securities
    48,555       46,783       59,890  
Investment securities available-for-sale, at fair value:
                       
Pledged securities with creditors’ right to repledge
    2,048,258       2,330,441       2,432,720  
Other investment securities available-for-sale
    3,693,225       4,364,273       4,560,571  
Investment securities held-to-maturity, at amortized cost (fair value as of September 30, 2010 — $214,803; December 31, 2009 — $213,146; September 30, 2009 — $210,913)
    214,152       212,962       212,950  
Other investment securities, at lower of cost or realizable value (realizable value as of September 30, 2010 — $159,622; December 31, 2009 — $165,497; September 30, 2009 — $176,286)
    158,309       164,149       174,943  
Loans held-for-sale measured at lower of cost or fair value
    115,088       90,796       75,447  
 
Loans held-in-portfolio:
                       
Loans not covered under loss sharing agreements with the FDIC
    22,249,167       23,827,263       24,512,966  
Loans covered under loss sharing agreements with the FDIC
    4,006,227              
Less — Unearned income
    106,685       114,150       116,897  
Allowance for loan losses
    1,243,994       1,261,204       1,207,401  
 
Total loans held-in-portfolio, net
    24,904,715       22,451,909       23,188,668  
 
FDIC loss share indemnification asset
    3,308,959              
Premises and equipment, net
    531,849       584,853       589,592  
Other real estate not covered under loss sharing agreements with the FDIC
    168,823       125,483       129,485  
Other real estate covered under loss sharing agreements with the FDIC
    77,516              
Accrued income receivable
    160,167       126,080       131,745  
Mortgage servicing assets, at fair value
    165,947       169,747       180,335  
Other assets (See Note 13)
    1,459,985       1,324,917       1,156,721  
Goodwill
    665,333       604,349       606,508  
Other intangible assets
    60,438       43,803       46,067  
 
Total assets
  $ 40,820,716     $ 34,736,325     $ 35,637,804  
 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
                       
Liabilities:
                       
Deposits:
                       
Non-interest bearing
  $ 5,371,439     $ 4,495,301     $ 4,281,817  
Interest bearing
    22,368,605       21,429,593       22,101,081  
 
Total deposits
    27,740,044       25,924,894       26,382,898  
Federal funds purchased and assets sold under agreements to repurchase
    2,358,139       2,632,790       2,807,891  
Other short-term borrowings
    191,342       7,326       3,077  
Notes payable
    5,143,388       2,648,632       2,649,821  
Other liabilities
    1,278,603       983,866       1,051,661  
 
Total liabilities
    36,711,516       32,197,508       32,895,348  
 
Commitments and contingencies (See Note 19)
                       
 
Stockholders’ equity:
                       
Preferred stock, 30,000,000 shares authorized; 2,006,391 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009 (aggregate liquidation preference — $50,160)
    50,160       50,160       50,160  
Common stock, $0.01 par value; 1,700,000,000 shares authorized as of September 30, 2010 (December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009 — 700,000,000); 1,022,878,228 shares issued as of September 30, 2010 (December 31,2009 and September 30, 2009 — 639,544,895) and 1,022,686,418 outstanding as of September 30, 2010 (December 31, 2009 — 639,540,105; September 30, 2009 — 639,541,515)
    10,229       6,395       6,395  
Surplus
    4,094,302       2,804,238       2,794,660  
Accumulated deficit
    (130,808 )     (292,752 )     (69,525 )
Treasury stock — at cost, 191,810 shares as of September 30, 2010 (December 31, 2009 — 4,790 shares; September 30, 2009 — 3,380)
    (545 )     (15 )     (11 )
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax expense of $16,856 (December 31, 2009 — $33,964; September 30, 2009 — $57,302)
    85,862       (29,209 )     (39,223 )
 
Total stockholders’ equity
    4,109,200       2,538,817       2,742,456  
 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 40,820,716     $ 34,736,325     $ 35,637,804  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

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POPULAR, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (UNAUDITED)
                                 
    Quarter ended     Nine months ended  
    September 30,     September 30,  
(In thousands, except per share information)   2010     2009     2010     2009  
 
INTEREST INCOME:
                               
Loans
  $ 484,883     $ 371,366     $ 1,224,846     $ 1,155,378  
Money market investments
    1,391       1,510       4,326       7,024  
Investment securities
    57,277       74,360       185,118       223,661  
Trading account securities
    7,136       7,227       20,313       28,638  
 
Total interest income
    550,687       454,463       1,434,603       1,414,701  
 
INTEREST EXPENSE:
                               
Deposits
    86,330       118,941       269,919       395,432  
Short-term borrowings
    14,945       16,142       45,756       53,476  
Long-term debt
    62,494       42,991       184,117       133,858  
 
Total interest expense
    163,769       178,074       499,792       582,766  
 
Net interest income
    386,918       276,389       934,811       831,935  
Provision for loan losses
    215,013       331,063       657,471       1,053,036  
 
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    171,905       (54,674 )     277,340       (221,101 )
 
Service charges on deposit accounts
    48,608       54,208       149,865       161,412  
Other service fees (See Note 24)
    100,822       97,614       305,867       298,584  
Net gain (loss) on sale and valuation adjustments of investment securities
    3,732       (9,059 )     4,210       220,792  
Trading account profit
    5,860       7,579       8,101       31,241  
Loss on sale of loans, including adjustments to indemnity reserves, and valuation adjustments on loans held-for-sale
    (1,573 )     (8,728 )     (23,106 )     (35,994 )
FDIC loss share expense
    (36,936 )           (13,602 )      
Fair value change in equity appreciation instrument
    10,641             35,035        
Gain on sale of processing and technology business
    640,802             640,802        
Other operating income
    24,568       18,430       63,076       44,579  
 
Total non-interest income
    796,524       160,044       1,170,248       720,614  
 
OPERATING EXPENSES:
                               
Personnel costs:
                               
Salaries
    116,426       102,822       321,423       315,224  
Pension and other benefits
    24,779       27,725       78,746       96,820  
 
Total personnel costs
    141,205       130,547       400,169       412,044  
Net occupancy expenses
    28,425       28,269       86,359       80,734  
Equipment expenses
    25,432       24,983       74,231       76,289  
Other taxes
    13,872       13,109       38,635       39,369  
Professional fees
    48,224       28,694       109,498       80,643  
Communications
    9,514       11,902       31,628       36,115  
Business promotion
    11,260       8,905       29,759       26,761  
Printing and supplies
    2,876       2,857       7,898       8,664  
FDIC deposit insurance
    17,183       16,506       49,894       61,954  
Loss (gain) on early extinguishment of debt
    25,448       (79,304 )     26,426       (79,304 )
Other operating expenses
    45,697       31,753       119,464       104,955  
Amortization of intangibles
    2,411       2,379       6,915       7,218  
 
Total operating expenses
    371,547       220,600       980,876       855,442  
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations before income tax
    596,882       (115,230 )     466,712       (355,929 )
Income tax expense (benefit)
    102,388       6,331       113,101       (15,209 )
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations
    494,494       (121,561 )     353,611       (340,720 )
Loss from discontinued operations, net of income tax
          (3,427 )           (19,972 )
 
NET INCOME (LOSS)
  $ 494,494       ($124,988 )   $ 353,611       ($360,692 )
 
NET INCOME APPLICABLE TO COMMON STOCK
  $ 494,494     $ 595,614     $ 161,944     $ 310,604  
 
NET INCOME PER COMMON SHARE — BASIC
                               
Net income from continuing operations
  $ 0.48     $ 1.41     $ 0.19     $ 1.00  
Net loss from discontinued operations
          (0.01 )           (0.06 )
 
Net income per common share — basic
  $ 0.48     $ 1.40     $ 0.19     $ 0.94  
 
NET INCOME PER COMMON SHARE — DILUTED
                               
Net income from continuing operations
  $ 0.48     $ 1.41     $ 0.19     $ 1.00  
Net loss from discontinued operations
          (0.01 )           (0.06 )
 
Net income per common share — diluted
  $ 0.48     $ 1.40     $ 0.19     $ 0.94  
 
DIVIDENDS DECLARED PER COMMON SHARE
                    $ 0.02  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

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POPULAR INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY(UNAUDITED)
                                                 
    Common stock,                           Accumulated other    
    including                           comprehensive    
(In thousands)   treasury stock   Preferred stock   Surplus   Accumulated deficit   (loss) income   Total
 
Balance as of December
31, 2008
  $ 1,566,277     $ 1,483,525     $ 621,879       ($374,488 )     ($28,829 )   $ 3,268,364  
Net loss
                            (360,692 )             (360,692 )
Accretion of discount
            4,515  [3]             (4,515)  [3]                
Exchange of preferred stock for trust preferred securities issued
            (901,165 )             485,280  [1]             (415,885 )
Issuance of common stock in exchange of preferred stock
    1,717       (536,715 )     291,974       230,388  [1]             (12,636 )
Issuance of common stock in connection with early extinguishment of debt
    1,858               315,794                       317,652  
Issuance costs
                    1,018  [2]                     1,018  
Stock options expense on unexercised options, net of forfeitures
                    162                       162  
Change in par value
    (1,689,389)  [4]             1,689,389  [4]                        
Cash dividends declared:
                                               
Common stock
                            (5,641 )             (5,641 )
Preferred stock
                            (39,857 )             (39,857 )
Common stock reissuance
    378                                       378  
Common stock purchases
    (13 )                                     (13 )
Treasury stock retired
    125,556               (125,556 )                        
Other comprehensive loss, net of tax
                                    (10,394 )     (10,394 )
 
Balance as of September
                                               
30, 2009
  $ 6,384     $ 50,160     $ 2,794,660       ($69,525 )     ($39,223 )   $ 2,742,456  
 
Balance as of December
                                               
31, 2009
  $ 6,380     $ 50,160     $ 2,804,238       ($292,752 )     ($29,209 )   $ 2,538,817  
Net income
                            353,611               353,611  
Issuance of stocks
            1,150,000  [5]                             1,150,000  
Issuance of common stock upon conversion of preferred stock
    3,834  [5]     (1,150,000)  [5]     1,337,833  [5]                     191,667  
Issuance costs
                    (47,769)  [6]                     (47,769 )
Deemed dividend on preferred stock
                            (191,667 )             (191,667 )
Common stock purchases
    (530 )                                     (530 )
Other comprehensive income, net of tax
                                    115,071       115,071  
 
Balance as of September
                                               
30, 2010
  $ 9,684     $ 50,160     $ 4,094,302       ($130,808 )   $ 85,862     $ 4,109,200  
 
 
[1]   Excess of carrying amount of preferred stock exchanged over fair value of new trust preferred securities and common stock issued
 
[2]   Net of issuance costs of preferred stock exchanged and issuance costs related to exchange and issuance of new common stock
 
[3]   Accretion of preferred stock discount 2008 Series C preferred stock
 
[4]   Change in par value from $6.00 to $0.01 (not in thousands)
 
[5]   Issuance and subsequent conversion of depositary shares representing interests in shares of contingent convertible non-cumulative preferred stock Series D into common stock
 
[6]   Issuance costs related to issuance and conversion of depositary shares (Preferred stock — Series D)

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CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Disclosure of changes in number of shares:
                         
    September 30,   December 31,   September 30,
    2010   2009   2009
 
Preferred Stock:
                       
Balance at beginning of period (January 1)
    2,006,391       24,410,000       24,410,000  
Issuance of stocks
    1,150,000  [1]                
Exchange of stocks
            (22,403,609 ) [2]     (22,403,609 ) [2]
Conversion of stocks
    (1,150,000 ) [1]              
 
Balance at end of period
    2,006,391       2,006,391       2,006,391  
 
Common Stock — Issued:
                       
Balance at beginning of period
    639,544,895       295,632,080       295,632,080  
Issuance of stocks
    383,333,333  [1]     357,510,076  [3]     357,510,076  [3]
Treasury stock retired
          (13,597,261 )     (13,597,261 )
 
Balance at end of period
    1,022,878,228       639,544,895       639,544,895  
 
Treasury Stock
    (191,810 )     (4,790 )     (3,380 )
 
Common Stock — Outstanding
    1,022,686,418       639,540,105       639,541,515  
 
 
[1]   Issuance of 46,000,000 in depositary shares; converted into 383,333,333 common shares (full conversion of depositary shares, each representing a 1/40th interest in shares of contingent convertible perpetual non-cumulative preferred stock, into common stock).
 
[2]   Exchange of 21,468,609 preferred stock Series A and B for common shares, and exchange of 935,000 preferred stock Series C for trust preferred securities.
 
[3]   Shares issued in exchange of Series A and B preferred stock and early extinguishment of debt (exchange of trust preferred securities for common stock).
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

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POPULAR, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS) (UNAUDITED)
                                 
    Quarter ended     Nine months ended  
    September 30,     September 30,  
(In thousands)   2010     2009     2010     2009  
 
Net income (loss)
  $ 494,494       ($124,988 )   $ 353,611       ($360,692 )
 
Other comprehensive income (loss) before tax:
                               
Foreign currency translation adjustment
    1,017       (1,360 )     440       (2,117 )
Reclassification adjustment for losses included in net income (loss)
    4,967             4,967        
Adjustment of pension and postretirement benefit plans
    1,709       3,128       7,945       66,223  
Unrealized holding gains on securities available-for-sale arising during the period
    7,438       82,934       124,350       63,535  
Reclassification adjustment for (gains) losses included in net income (loss)
    (3,717 )     3,688       (3,701 )     (173,868 )
Unrealized net losses on cash flow hedges
    (623 )     (995 )     (2,163 )     (2,618 )
Reclassification adjustment for losses included in net income (loss)
    1,509       37       341       5,920  
 
Other comprehensive income (loss) before tax:
    12,300       87,432       132,179       (42,925 )
Income tax (expense) benefit
    (888 )     (9,955 )     (17,108 )     32,531  
 
Total other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax
    11,412       77,477       115,071       (10,394 )
 
Comprehensive income (loss), net of tax
  $ 505,906       ($47,511 )   $ 468,682       ($371,086 )
 
Tax Effects Allocated to Each Component of Other Comprehensive Income (Loss):
                                 
    Quarter ended     Nine months ended  
    September 30,     September 30,  
(In thousands)   2010     2009     2010     2009  
 
Underfunding of pension and postretirement benefit plans
    ($882 )     ($1,272 )     ($2,647 )     ($24,055 )
Unrealized holding gains on securities available-for-sale arising during the period
    (217 )     (9,137 )     (15,724 )     (5,844 )
Reclassification adjustment for (gains) losses included in net income (loss)
    556       81       552       62,790  
Unrealized net losses on cash flows hedges
    244       388       844       1,021  
Reclassification adjustment for losses included in net income (loss)
    (589 )     (15 )     (133 )     (1,381 )
 
Income tax (expense) benefit
    ($888 )     ($9,955 )     ($17,108 )   $ 32,531  
 
Disclosure of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss):
                         
    September 30,   December 31,   September 30,
(In thousands)   2010   2009   2009
 
Foreign currency translation adjustment
    ($35,269 )     ($40,676 )     ($41,185 )
 
Underfunding of pension and postretirement benefit plans
    (119,841 )     (127,786 )     (193,986 )
Tax effect
    45,919       48,566       75,586  
 
Underfunding of pension and postretirement benefit plans, net of tax
    (73,922 )     (79,220 )     (118,400 )
 
Unrealized holding gains on securities available-for-sale
    224,739       104,090       139,641  
Tax effect
    (29,306 )     (14,134 )     (18,672 )
 
Unrealized holding gains on securities available-for-sale, net of tax
    195,433       89,956       120,969  
 
Unrealized (losses) gains on cash flows hedges
    (623 )     1,199       (995 )
Tax effect
    243       (468 )     388  
 
Unrealized (losses) gains on cash flows hedges, net of tax
    (380 )     731       (607 )
 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
  $ 85,862       ($29,209 )     ($39,223 )
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

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POPULAR, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)

                 
    Nine months ended
    September 30,
(In thousands)   2010   2009
 
Cash flows from operating activities:
               
Net income (loss)
  $ 353,611       ($360,692 )
 
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by operating activities:
               
Depreciation and amortization of premises and equipment
    47,084       49,033  
Provision for loan losses
    657,471       1,053,036  
Amortization of intangibles
    6,915       7,218  
Fair value adjustments of mortgage servicing rights
    19,959       17,598  
Net (accretion of discounts) amortization of premiums and deferred fees
    (150,577 )     50,613  
Net gain on sale and valuation adjustments of investment securities
    (4,210 )     (220,792 )
Fair value change in equity appreciation instrument
    (35,035 )      
FDIC loss share expense
    13,602        
Gains from changes in fair value related to instruments measured at fair value pursuant to the fair value option
          (1,674 )
Net (gain) loss on disposition of premises and equipment
    (1,993 )     1,696  
Net loss on sale of loans, including adjustments to indemnity reserves, and valuation adjustments on loans held-for-sale
    23,106       41,202  
Loss (gain) on early extinguishment of debt
    26,426       (79,304 )
Gain on sale of processing and technology business, net of transaction costs
    (616,186 )      
Earnings from investments under the equity method
    (16,144 )     (14,307 )
Stock options expense
          162  
Deferred income taxes, net of valuation
    2,458       (76,444 )
Net disbursements on loans held-for-sale
    (494,312 )     (919,719 )
Acquisitions of loans held-for-sale
    (213,897 )     (280,243 )
Proceeds from sale of loans held-for-sale
    57,831       65,258  
Net decrease in trading securities
    565,611       1,302,093  
Net decrease in accrued income receivable
    1,806       24,935  
Net decrease in other assets
    5,521       26,935  
Net decrease in interest payable
    (34,559 )     (57,763 )
Net increase in postretirement benefit obligation
    1,825       3,652  
Net increase in other liabilities
    95,902       65,431  
 
Total adjustments
    (41,396 )     1,058,616  
 
Net cash provided by operating activities
    312,215       697,924  
 
Cash flows from investing activities:
               
Net increase in money market investments
    (924,913 )     (304,169 )
Purchases of investment securities:
               
Available-for-sale
    (688,678 )     (4,105,915 )
Held-to-maturity
    (52,198 )     (54,562 )
Other
    (44,021 )     (36,601 )
Proceeds from calls, paydowns, maturities and redemptions of investment securities:
               
Available-for-sale
    1,329,390       1,261,801  
Held-to-maturity
    51,067       136,535  
Other
    108,470       62,480  
Proceeds from sale of investment securities available-for-sale
    396,676       3,825,502  
Proceeds from sale of other investment securities
          52,294  
Net repayments on loans
    1,292,935       666,618  
Proceeds from sale of loans
    15,908       325,414  
Acquisition of loan portfolios
    (130,488 )     (37,965 )
Cash received from acquisitions
    261,311        
Net proceeds from sale of processing and technology businesses
    642,322        
Mortgage servicing rights purchased
    (598 )     (1,029 )
Acquisition of premises and equipment
    (40,336 )     (55,625 )
Proceeds from sale of premises and equipment
    13,503       36,105  
Proceeds from sale of foreclosed assets
    120,412       107,720  
 
Net cash provided by investing activities
    2,350,762       1,878,603  
 
Cash flows from financing activities:
               
Net decrease in deposits
    (574,739 )     (1,167,108 )
Net decrease in assets sold under agreements to repurchase
    (274,651 )     (743,717 )
Net increase (decrease) in other short-term borrowings
    184,016       (1,857 )
Payments of notes payable
    (3,281,449 )     (807,002 )
Proceeds from issuance of notes payable
    111,101       61,100  
Prepayment penalties paid on cancellation of debt
    (25,475 )      
Net proceeds from issuance of depositary shares
    1,102,231        
Dividends paid
          (71,438 )
Issuance costs and fees paid on exchange of preferred stock and trust preferred securities
          (24,618 )
Treasury stock acquired
    (530 )     (13 )
 
Net cash used in financing activities
    (2,759,496 )     (2,754,653 )
 
Net decrease in cash and due from banks
    (96,519 )     (178,126 )
Cash and due from banks at beginning of period
    677,330       784,987  
 
Cash and due from banks at end of period
  $ 580,811     $ 606,861  
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.
Note: The Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the nine months ended September 30, 2009 includes the cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities associated with discontinued operations.

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Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements
         
Note 1
    Nature of Operations
Note 2
    Business Combination
Note 3
    Sale of Processing and Technology Business
Note 4
    Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 5
    Adoption of New Accounting Standards and Issued But Not Yet Effective Accounting Standards
Note 6
    Discontinued Operations
Note 7
    Restrictions on Cash and Due from Banks and Certain Securities
Note 8
    Pledged Assets
Note 9
    Investment Securities Available-For-Sale
Note 10
    Investment Securities Held-to-Maturity
Note 11
    Loans Held-in-Portfolio and Allowance for Loan Losses
Note 12
    Transfers of Financial Assets and Mortgage Servicing Rights
Note 13
    Other Assets
Note 14
    Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets
Note 15
    Deposits
Note 16
    Borrowings
Note 17
    Trust Preferred Securities
Note 18
    Stockholders’ Equity
Note 19
    Commitments, Contingencies and Guarantees
Note 20
    Non-consolidated Variable Interest Entities
Note 21
    Fair Value Measurement
Note 22
    Fair Value of Financial Instruments
Note 23
    Net Income per Common Share
Note 24
    Other Service Fees
Note 25
    Pension and Postretirement Benefits
Note 26
    Stock-Based Compensation
Note 27
    Income Taxes
Note 28
    Supplemental Disclosure on the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
Note 29
    Segment Reporting
Note 30
    Subsequent Events
Note 31
    Condensed Consolidating Financial Information of Guarantor and Issuers of Registered Guaranteed Securities

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Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements
Note 1 — Nature of Operations
Popular, Inc. (the “Corporation” or “Popular”) is a diversified, publicly owned financial holding company subject to the supervision and regulation of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. The Corporation has operations in Puerto Rico, the United States, the Caribbean and Latin America. In Puerto Rico, the Corporation provides retail and commercial banking services through its principal banking subsidiary, Banco Popular de Puerto Rico (“BPPR”), as well as auto and equipment leasing and financing, mortgage loans, investment banking, broker-dealer and insurance services through specialized subsidiaries. In the United States, the Corporation operates Banco Popular North America (“BPNA”), including its wholly-owned subsidiary E-LOAN. BPNA is a community bank providing a broad range of financial services and products to the communities it serves. BPNA operates branches in New York, California, Illinois, New Jersey and Florida. E-LOAN markets deposit accounts under its name for the benefit of BPNA. The sections that follow provide a description of two significant transactions that impacted the Corporation’s operations during 2010.
Westernbank FDIC-Assisted Transaction
On April 30, 2010, BPPR entered into a purchase and assumption agreement with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”) to acquire certain assets and assume certain deposits and liabilities of Westernbank Puerto Rico, a Puerto Rico state-chartered bank headquartered in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico (“Westernbank”)(herein the “Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction”). Westernbank was a wholly-owned commercial bank subsidiary of W Holding Company, Inc. and operated through a network of 44 branches located throughout Puerto Rico. In August 2010, Popular successfully completed the Westernbank’s systems and branch conversions. All retail and commercial accounts were converted to Popular’s applications. Furthermore, out of the estimated 1,440 full-time equivalent employees (“FTEs”) that Westernbank had at the time of acquisition, the Corporation has hired to date close to 816 FTEs. The Corporation retained a limited number of the branches, some of which were consolidated with other existing branches of BPPR. Refer to Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements for detailed information on the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction. Refer to the Corporation’s Form 8-K/A filed on July 16, 2010 for additional information with respect to this FDIC-assisted transaction.
EVERTEC
On September 30, 2010, the Corporation completed the sale of a 51% interest in EVERTEC, including the Corporation’s merchant acquiring and processing and technology businesses (the “EVERTEC transaction”), and continues to hold the remaining 49% interest in the company. Refer to Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements for a description of the EVERTEC transaction. EVERTEC provides transaction processing services throughout the Caribbean and Latin America, and continues to provide processing and technology services to many of Popular’s subsidiaries.
Note 2 — Business Combination
As indicated in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, on April 30, 2010, the Corporation’s banking subsidiary, BPPR, acquired certain assets and assumed certain deposits of Westernbank Puerto Rico from the FDIC, as receiver for Westernbank, in an assisted transaction. BPPR acquired approximately $9.1 billion in assets and assumed approximately $2.4 billion in deposits, excluding the effects of purchase accounting adjustments. As part of the transaction, on April 30, 2010, BPPR issued a five-year $5.8 billion note payable to the FDIC bearing an annual interest rate of 2.50%. The note is secured by a substantial amount of the assets, including loans and foreclosed other real estate properties acquired by BPPR from the FDIC in the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction, and which are subject to the loss sharing agreements. In addition, as part of the consideration for the transaction, the FDIC received a cash-settled equity appreciation instrument, which is described in detail below.
Loss Sharing Agreements
In connection with the acquisition, BPPR entered into loss sharing agreements with the FDIC with respect to approximately $8.6 billion of loans and other real estate (the “covered assets”) acquired in the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction. Pursuant to the terms of the loss sharing agreements, the FDIC’s obligation to reimburse BPPR for losses with respect to covered assets begins with the first dollar of loss incurred. The FDIC will reimburse BPPR

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for 80% of losses with respect to covered assets, and BPPR will reimburse the FDIC for 80% of recoveries with respect to losses for which the FDIC paid BPPR 80% reimbursement under the loss sharing agreements. The loss sharing agreement applicable to single-family residential mortgage loans provides for FDIC loss and recoveries sharing for ten years. The loss sharing agreement applicable to commercial and consumer loans provides for FDIC loss sharing for five years and BPPR reimbursement to the FDIC for eight years, in each case, on the same terms and conditions as described above.
In addition, BPPR has agreed to make a true-up payment to the FDIC on the date that is 45 days following the last day (the “True-Up Measurement Date”) of the final shared loss month, or upon the final disposition of all covered assets under the loss sharing agreements in the event losses on the loss sharing agreements fail to reach expected levels. The estimated fair value of such true-up payment is recorded as a reduction in the fair value of the FDIC loss share indemnification asset. Under the loss sharing agreements, BPPR shall pay to the FDIC, 50% of the excess, if any, of: (i) 20% of the Intrinsic Loss Estimate of $4.6 billion (or $925 million)(as determined by the FDIC) less (ii) the sum of: (A) 25% of the asset discount (per bid) (or ($1.1 billion)); plus (B) 25% of the cumulative shared-loss payments (defined as the aggregate of all of the payments made or payable to BPPR minus the aggregate of all of the payments made or payable to the FDIC); plus (C) the sum of the period servicing amounts for every consecutive twelve-month period prior to and ending on the True-Up Measurement Date in respect of each of the loss sharing agreements during which the loss sharing provisions of the applicable loss sharing agreement is in effect (defined as the product of the simple average of the principal amount of shared loss loans and shared loss assets at the beginning and end of such period times 1%).
Covered loans under loss sharing agreements with the FDIC (the “covered loans”) are reported in loans exclusive of the estimated FDIC loss share indemnification asset. The covered loans acquired in the Westernbank transaction are, and will continue to be, reviewed for collectability. Under ASC Subtopic 310-30, if there is a decrease in the expected cash flows on loans due to an increase in estimated credit losses compared to the estimate made at the April 30, 2010 acquisition date, the Corporation will record a charge to the provision for loan losses and an allowance for loan losses will be established. If there is an increase in inherent losses on the loans accounted for under ASC Subtopic 310-20, an allowance for loan losses will be established to record the loans at their net realizable value. A related credit to income and an increase in the FDIC loss share indemnification asset will be recognized at the same time, measured based on the loss share percentages described above, for ASC Subtopic 310-20 and 310-30 loans.
The operating results of the Corporation for the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2010 include the operating results produced by the acquired assets and liabilities assumed for the period of May 1, 2010 to September 30, 2010. The Corporation believes that given the nature of assets and liabilities assumed, the significant amount of fair value adjustments, the nature of additional consideration provided to the FDIC (note payable and equity appreciation instrument) and the FDIC loss sharing agreements now in place, historical results of Westernbank are not meaningful to Popular’s results, and thus no pro forma information is presented.

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The following table presents balances recorded by the Corporation at the time of the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction on April 30, 2010.
                                 
    Book value prior                    
    to purchase                   As recorded by
    accounting   Fair value   Additional   Popular, Inc. on
(In thousands)   adjustments   adjustments   consideration   April 30, 2010
Assets:
                               
Cash and money market investments
  $ 358,132                 $ 358,132  
Investment in Federal Home Loan Bank stock
    58,610                   58,610  
Covered loans
    8,503,839       ($4,286,847 )           4,216,992  
Non-covered loans
    50,905       (6,909 )           43,996  
FDIC loss share indemnification asset
          3,322,561             3,322,561  
Covered other real estate owned
    125,947       (52,712 )           73,235  
Core deposit intangible
          24,415             24,415  
Receivable from FDIC (associated to the note issued to the FDIC)
              $ 111,101       111,101  
Other assets
    44,926                   44,926  
 
Total assets
  $ 9,142,359       ($999,492 )   $ 111,101     $ 8,253,968  
 
 
                               
Liabilities:
                               
Deposits
  $ 2,380,170     $ 11,465           $ 2,391,635  
Note issued to the FDIC (including a premium of $11,612 resulting from the fair value adjustment)
              $ 5,769,696       5,769,696  
Equity appreciation instrument
                52,500       52,500  
Contingent liability on unfunded loan commitments
          132,442             132,442  
Accrued expenses and other liabilities
    13,925                   13,925  
 
Total liabilities
  $ 2,394,095     $ 143,907     $ 5,822,196     $ 8,360,198  
 
Excess of assets acquired over liabilities assumed
  $ 6,748,264                          
 
Aggregate fair value adjustments
            ($1,143,399 )                
 
Aggregate additional consideration, net
                  $ 5,711,095          
 
Goodwill on acquisition
                          $ 106,230  
 
As previously disclosed, the fair values initially assigned to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed were preliminary and subject to refinement for up to one year after the closing date of the acquisition as new information relative to closing date fair values becomes available. Because of the size of the transaction and delays in the receipt of certain information, the Corporation continues to analyze its estimates of fair value on loans acquired, FDIC loss share indemnification asset recorded and the note issued to the FDIC. As the Corporation finalizes its analyses of these assets and liabilities, there may be adjustments to the recorded carrying values, and thus the recognized goodwill may increase or decrease.
The following is a description of the methods used to determine the fair values of significant assets acquired and liabilities assumed in the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction:
Loans
Fair values for loans were based on a discounted cash flow methodology. Certain loans were valued individually, while other loans were valued as pools. Aggregation into pools considered characteristics such as loan type, payment term, rate type and accruing status. Principal and interest projections considered prepayment rates and credit loss expectations. The discount rates were developed based on the relative risk of the cash flows, taking into account principally the loan type, market rates as of the valuation date, liquidity expectations, and the expected life of the loans.
FDIC loss share indemnification asset
Fair value was estimated using projected cash flows related to the loss sharing agreements based on the expected reimbursements for losses, including consideration of the true up payment and the applicable loss sharing percentages. These expected reimbursements do not include reimbursable amounts related to future covered expenditures. The estimates of expected losses used in valuation of this asset are consistent with the loss estimates used in the valuation of the covered assets. These cash flows were discounted to reflect the estimated timing of the receipt of the loss share reimbursement from the FDIC and the value of any true-up payment due to the FDIC at the end of the loss sharing agreements, to the extent applicable. The discount rate used in this calculation was

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determined using a yield of an A-rated corporate security with a term based on the weighted average life of the recovery of cash flows plus a risk premium reflecting the uncertainty related to the timing of cash flows and the potential rejection of claims by the FDIC. Due to the increased uncertainty of the true-up payment, an additional risk premium was added to the discount rate.
As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation has not made any claims to the FDIC associated with losses incurred on covered loans or covered other real estate owned.
Receivable from the FDIC
The note issued to the FDIC as of the April 30, 2010 transaction date was determined based on a pro-forma statement of assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of February 24, 2010, the bid transaction date. The receivable from the FDIC represents an adjustment to reconcile the consideration paid based on the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of April 30, 2010 compared with the pro-forma statement as of February 24, 2010. The carrying amount of this receivable was a reasonable estimate of fair value based on its short-term nature. The receivable from the FDIC was collected by BPPR in June 2010 and is reflected as a cash inflow from financing activities in the consolidated statement of cash flows for the nine months ended September 30, 2010. The proceeds were remitted to the FDIC in July 2010 as a payment on the note.
Other real estate covered under loss sharing agreements with the FDIC (“OREO”)
OREO includes real estate acquired in settlement of loans. OREO properties were recorded at estimated fair values less costs to sell at the date acquired based on management’s assessments of existing appraisals or broker price opinions. The estimated costs to sell are based on past experience with similar property types and terms customary for real estate transactions.
Goodwill
The amount of goodwill is the residual difference in the fair value of liabilities assumed and net consideration paid to the FDIC over the fair value of the assets acquired. The goodwill is deductible for income tax purposes. The goodwill from the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction was assigned to the BPPR reportable segment.
Core deposit intangible
This intangible asset represents the value of the relationships that Westernbank had with its deposit customers. The fair value of this intangible asset was estimated based on a discounted cash flow methodology that gave appropriate consideration to expected customer attrition rates, cost of the core deposit base, interest costs, and the net maintenance cost attributable to customer deposits, and the cost of alternative funds.
Deposits
The fair values used for the demand and savings deposits that comprise the transaction accounts acquired, by definition equal the amount payable on demand at the reporting date. The fair values for time deposits were estimated using a discounted cash flow calculation that applies interest rates currently offered to comparable time deposits with similar maturities.
Contingent liability on unfunded loan commitments
Unfunded loan commitments are contractual obligations to provide future funding. The fair value of a liability associated to unfunded loan commitments is principally based on the expected utilization rate or likelihood that the commitment will be exercised. The estimated value of the unfunded commitments was equal to the expected loss associated with the balance expected to be funded. The expected loss is comprised of both credit and non-credit components; therefore, the discounts derived from the loan valuation were applied to the expected balance to be funded to derive the fair value. The unfunded loan commitments outstanding as of the April 30, 2010 transaction date, which approximated $227 million, relate principally to commercial and construction loans and commercial revolving lines of credit. Losses incurred on loan disbursements made under these unfunded loan commitments are covered by the FDIC loss sharing agreements provided that the Corporation complies with specific requirements under such agreements. The contingent liability on unfunded loan commitments is included as part of “other liabilities” in the consolidated statement of condition.

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Deferred taxes
Deferred taxes relate to a difference between the financial statement and tax basis of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in the transaction. Deferred taxes are reported based upon the principles in ASC Topic 740 “Income Taxes”, and are measured using the enacted statutory income tax rate to be in effect for BPPR at the time the deferred tax is expected to reverse, which is 39%.
For income tax purposes, the Westernbank transaction was accounted for as an asset purchase and the tax bases of assets acquired were allocated based on fair values using a modified residual method. Under this method, the purchase price was allocated among the assets in order of liquidity (the most liquid first) up to its fair market value.
Note issued to the FDIC
The fair value of the note issued to the FDIC was determined using discounted cash flows based on market rates currently available for debt with similar terms, including consideration that the debt is collateralized by the assets covered under the loss sharing agreements. The principal source of cash flows to pay down the note derives from the cash flows collected from the covered assets, as well as payments from the FDIC on claimed credit losses associated to the covered assets. The Corporation is required under the agreements with the FDIC to use those proceeds to repay the note and remit payments on a monthly basis.
Equity appreciation instrument
As part of the consideration for the acquisition of Westernbank assets, BPPR also issued an equity appreciation instrument to the FDIC. Under the terms of the equity appreciation instrument, the FDIC has the opportunity to obtain a cash payment with a value equal to the product of (a) 50 million units and (b) the difference between (i) Popular, Inc.’s “average volume weighted price” over the two NASDAQ trading days immediately prior to the exercise date and (ii) the exercise price of $3.43. The equity appreciation instrument is exercisable by the holder thereof, in whole or in part, up to May 7, 2011. The fair value of the equity appreciation instrument was estimated by determining a call option value using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model. The equity appreciation instrument is recorded as a liability and any subsequent changes in its estimated fair value will be recognized in earnings. The Corporation recognized non-interest income of $10.6 million and $35.0 million during the quarter and nine-month periods ended September 30, 2010, respectively, as a result of a decrease in the fair value of the equity appreciation instrument. These amounts are separately disclosed in the consolidated statement of operations within the non-interest income category.
Note 3 — Sale of Processing and Technology Business
On June 30, 2010, Popular and its subsidiaries BPPR, Popular International Bank, Inc. (“PIBI”) and EVERTEC completed an internal reorganization transferring certain intellectual property assets and interests in certain of the Corporation’s foreign subsidiaries to EVERTEC. Commencing on June 30, 2010, PIBI’s wholly-owned subsidiaries ATH Costa Rica S.A. and T.I.I. Smart Solutions Inc. became wholly-owned subsidiaries of EVERTEC. Also, in connection with the reorganization, BPPR’s Merchant Business and TicketPop divisions were transferred to EVERTEC. On September 30, 2010, EVERTEC DE VENEZUELA, C.A. became a subsidiary of PIBI and EVERTEC LATINOAMERICA, SOCIEDAD ANONIMA was transferred from PIBI to EVERTEC.
On September 30, 2010, the Corporation completed the sale of a majority interest in its processing and technology business EVERTEC, including the businesses transferred in the internal reorganization discussed above. The Corporation retained EVERTEC’s operations in Venezuela and certain related contracts. Under the terms of the sale, an unrelated third party acquired a 51% interest in EVERTEC for cash under a leverage buyout. The Corporation retained the remaining 49% interest. The Corporation’s investment in EVERTEC, which is accounted for under the equity method, amounted to $177 million as of September 30, 2010, and is included as part of “other assets” in the consolidated statement of condition. The Corporation’s proportionate share of income or loss from EVERTEC will be included in other operating income in the consolidated statements of operations commencing on October 1, 2010.
As a result of the sale, the Corporation recognized a pre-tax gain, net of transaction costs, of approximately $616.2 million ($531.0 million after-tax), of which $640.8 million was separately disclosed within non-interest income in the consolidated statement of operations and $24.6 million are included as operating expenses (transaction costs) for the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2010. Approximately $94.0 million of the pre-tax gain was the result of marking the Corporation’s retained interest in the EVERTEC business at fair value. This portion of the gain was non-cash. The equity value of the Corporation’s retained interest in the former subsidiary takes into consideration the buyer’s enterprise value of EVERTEC reduced by the leverage financing, net of debt issue costs, utilized as part of the sale transaction. This leverage financing significantly impacts the resulting fair value of the retained interest.

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In connection with the leverage transaction, EVERTEC issued financing in the form of unsecured senior notes and a syndicated loan (senior secured credit facility). The Corporation invested $35 million in senior unsecured notes issued by EVERTEC ($17.85 million, net of the intercompany elimination related to the 49% ownership interest maintained by Popular), which bear interest at an annual fixed rate of 11% and mature in October 2018. Also, the Corporation provided financing to EVERTEC by acquiring $58.2 million of the syndicated loan ($29.7 million, net of intercompany eliminations).
Also, as part of the sale, Popular entered into various agreements including a master services agreement pursuant to which EVERTEC will continue providing various processing and information technology services to Popular, BPPR, and their respective subsidiaries. These service costs will be included prospectively in operating expenses on the Corporation’s consolidated statements of operations, net of elimination entries that are required due to Popular holding a 49% ownership interest in EVERTEC. Also, as part of the agreement, BPPR commits to support the ATH debit cards as well as the ATH network, owned and operated by EVERTEC.
The equity investments in the processing businesses of Servicios Financieros, S.A. de C.V. (“Serfinsa”) and Consorcio de Tarjetas Dominicanas, S.A. (“CONTADO”) continued to be held by the Corporation as of September 30, 2010. Under the terms of the merger agreement, the Corporation is required for a period of twelve months following the merger to continue to seek to sell its equity interests in such entities to EVERTEC, subject to complying with certain rights of first refusal in favor of the Serfinsa and CONTADO shareholders. The Corporation’s investments in Serfinsa and Contado, accounted for under the equity method, amounted to $1.3 million and $15.9 million, respectively, as of September 30, 2010.
Note 4 — Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Popular, Inc. and its majority-owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The consolidated interim financial statements have been prepared without audit. The statement of condition data as of December 31, 2009 was derived from audited financial statements. The unaudited interim financial statements are, in the opinion of management, a fair statement of the results for the periods reported and include all necessary adjustments, all of a normal recurring nature, for a fair statement of such results.
Certain information and note disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America have been condensed or omitted from the unaudited financial statements pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Accordingly, these financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements of the Corporation for the year ended December 31, 2009, included in the Corporation’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on March 1, 2010 (the “2009 Annual Report”). Additionally, where applicable, the policies conform to the accounting and reporting guidelines prescribed by bank regulatory authorities. Operating results for the interim periods disclosed herein are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for a full year or any future period.
Use of Estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated statement of condition.
Management exercised significant judgment regarding assumptions about discount rates, future expected cash flows including prepayments, default rates, market conditions and other future events that are highly subjective in nature, and subject to change, and all of which affected the estimation of the fair values of the net assets acquired in the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction. Actual results could differ from those estimates; others provided with the same information could draw different reasonable conclusions and calculate different fair values. Changes that may vary significantly from our assumptions include loan prepayments, credit losses, the estimated market values of collateral at disposition, the timing of such disposition, and deposit attrition.
Reclassifications
Servicing rights related to commercial loans (Small Business Administration), which are accounted for under the amortization method, have been reclassified to other assets in all periods presented, while mortgage servicing rights, which are accounted for at fair value, are presented separately in the consolidated statements of condition. Amounts reported in prior periods’ consolidated financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current presentation. Such reclassifications had no effect on previously reported cash flows, shareholders’ equity or net income.

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Business Acquisition
The Corporation determined that the acquisition of certain assets and assumption of certain liabilities of Westernbank in the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction constitutes a business acquisition as defined by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Codification (“ASC”) Topic 805 “Business Combinations”. The assets and liabilities, both tangible and intangible, were initially recorded at their estimated fair values. Fair values were determined based on the requirements of FASB Codification Topic 820 “Fair Value Measurements”. These fair value estimates are preliminary and subject to refinement for up to one year after the closing date of the acquisition as additional information regarding the closing date fair value becomes available. Acquisition-related costs are expensed as incurred.
Loans acquired in an FDIC-assisted transaction
Loans acquired in a business acquisition are recorded at their fair value at the acquisition date. Credit discounts are included in the determination of fair value; therefore, an allowance for loan losses is not recorded at the acquisition date.
Loans accounted for under ASC Subtopic 310-30 represent loans showing evidence of credit deterioration and that it is probable, at the date of acquisition, that the Corporation will not collect all contractually required principal and interest payments. Generally, acquired loans that meet the definition for nonaccrual status fall within the Corporation’s definition of impaired loans under ASC Subtopic 310-30. Also, based on the fair value determined for the acquired portfolio, acquired loans that did not meet the definition of nonaccrual status also resulted in the recognition of a significant discount attributable to credit quality. Accordingly, an election was made by the Corporation to apply the accretable yield method (expected cash flow model of ASC Subtopic 310-30), as a loan with credit deterioration and impairment, instead of the standard loan discount accretion guidance of ASC Subtopic 310-20. These loans are disclosed as a loan that was acquired with credit deterioration and impairment.
The Corporation applied the guidance of ASC Subtopic 310-30 to all loans acquired in the transaction (including loans that do not meet scope of ASC Subtopic 310-30), except for credit cards and revolving lines of credit that were expressly scoped out from the application of this guidance since they continued to have revolving privileges after acquisition. Management used its judgment in evaluating factors impacting expected cash flows and probable loss assumptions, including the quality of the loan portfolio, portfolio concentrations, distressed economic conditions in Puerto Rico, quality of underwriting standards of the acquired institution, reductions in collateral real estate values, among other considerations that could also impact the expected cash inflows on the loans.
Under ASC Subtopic 310-30, the covered loans acquired from the FDIC were aggregated into pools based on loans that had common risk characteristics. Each loan pool is accounted for as a single asset with a single composite interest rate and an aggregate expectation of cash flows. Characteristics considered in pooling loans in the FDIC-assisted transaction included loan type, interest rate type, accruing status, and amortization type. Once the pools are defined, the Corporation maintains the integrity of the pool of multiple loans accounted for as a single asset.
Under ASC Subtopic 310-30, the difference between the undiscounted cash flows expected at acquisition and the fair value in the loans, or the “accretable yield,” is recognized as interest income using the effective yield method over the estimated life of the loan if the timing and amount of the future cash flows of the pool is reasonably estimable. The non-accretable difference represents the difference between contractually required principal and interest and the cash flows expected to be collected. Subsequent to the acquisition date, increases in cash flows over those expected at the acquisition date are recognized as interest income prospectively. Decreases in expected cash flows after the acquisition date are recognized by recording an allowance for loan losses.
The fair value discount of lines of credit with revolving privileges that are accounted for pursuant to the guidance of ASC Subtopic 310-20 represents the difference between the contractually required loan payment receivable in excess of the initial investment in the loan. This discount is accreted into interest income over the life of the loan if the loan is in accruing status. Any cash flows collected in excess of the carrying amount of the loan are recognized in earnings at the time of collection. The carrying amount of lines of credit with revolving privileges, which are accounted pursuant to the guidance of ASC Subtopic 310-20, are subject to periodic review to determine the need for recognizing an allowance for loan losses.
Covered Assets

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Assets subject to loss sharing agreements with the FDIC are labeled “covered” on the consolidated statement of condition and include certain loans and other real estate properties. Loans acquired in the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction, except for credit cards, are considered “covered loans” because the Corporation will be reimbursed for 80% of any future losses on these loans subject to the terms of the FDIC loss sharing agreements.
FDIC Loss Share Indemnification Asset
The acquisition date fair value of the reimbursement that the Corporation expects to receive from the FDIC under the loss sharing agreements was recorded as an FDIC loss share indemnification asset on the consolidated statement of condition. Fair value was estimated using projected cash flows related to the loss sharing agreements. Refer to Note 2 for additional information on the valuation methodology.
The FDIC loss share indemnification asset for loss share agreements is measured separately from the related covered assets as it is not contractually embedded in the assets and is not transferable with the assets should the assets be sold.
The impact of the FDIC loss share indemnification on the Corporation’s results of operations is included in non-interest income, particularly in the category of “FDIC loss share expense”, and considers the accretion due to discounting and the changes in expected loss sharing reimbursements.
The indemnification asset is recognized on the same basis as the assets subject to loss share protection. As such, for covered loans accounted pursuant to ASC Subtopic 310-30, decreases in expected reimbursements will be recognized in income prospectively consistent with the approach taken to recognize increases in cash flows on covered loans. For covered loans accounted for under ASC Subtopic 310-20, as the loan discount recorded as of the acquisition date is accreted into income, a reduction of the corresponding indemnification asset is recorded as a reduction in non-interest income.
Increases in expected reimbursements will be recognized in income in the same period that the allowance for credit losses for the related loans is recognized.
Equity Appreciation Instrument
The equity appreciation instrument is recorded as an “other liability” in the consolidated statement of condition and any subsequent change in its estimated fair value is recognized in earnings on each quarterly reporting date. Refer to Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information on the equity appreciation instrument issued to the FDIC.
Note 5 — Adoption of New Accounting Standards and Issued But Not Yet Effective Accounting Standards
FASB Accounting Standards Update 2009-16, Transfers and Servicing (Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 860) — Accounting for Transfers of Financial Assets (“ASU 2009-16”)
ASU 2009-16 amends previous guidance relating to transfers of financial assets and eliminates the concept of a qualifying special-purpose entity, removes the exception for guaranteed mortgage securitizations when a transferor has not surrendered control over the transferred financial assets, changes the requirements for derecognizing financial assets, and includes additional disclosures requiring more information about transfers of financial assets in which entities have continuing exposure to the risks related to the transferred financial assets. Among the most significant amendments and additions to this guidance are changes to the conditions for sales of financial assets which objective is to determine whether a transferor and its consolidated affiliates included in the financial statements have surrendered control over transferred financial assets or third-party beneficial interests, and the addition of the meaning of the term participating interest which represents a proportionate (pro rata) ownership interest in an entire financial asset. The requirements for sale accounting must be applied only to a financial asset in its entirety, a pool of financial assets in its entirety, or participating interests as defined in ASC paragraph 860-10-40-6A. This guidance has been applied as of the beginning of the first annual reporting period that began after November 15, 2009, for interim periods within that first annual reporting period and will be applied for interim and annual reporting periods thereafter. Earlier application was prohibited. The recognition and measurement provisions have been applied to transfers that have occurred on or after the effective date. On and after the effective date,

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existing qualifying special-purpose entities have been evaluated for consolidation in accordance with the applicable consolidation guidance in the Codification. The Corporation adopted this new authoritative accounting guidance effective January 1, 2010. The Corporation evaluated transfers of financial assets executed during the nine months ended September 30, 2010 pursuant to the new accounting guidance, principally consisting of guaranteed mortgage securitizations (Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”) and Federal National Mortgage Association (“FNMA”) mortgage-backed securities), and determined that the adoption of ASU 2009-16 did not have a significant impact on the Corporation’s accounting for such transactions or results of operations or financial condition for such period.
A securitization of a financial asset, a participating interest in a financial asset, or a pool of financial assets in which the Corporation (and its consolidated affiliates) (a) surrenders control over the transferred assets and (b) receives cash or other proceeds is accounted for as a sale. Control is considered to be surrendered only if all three of the following conditions are met: (1) the assets have been legally isolated; (2) the transferee has the ability to pledge or exchange the assets; and (3) the transferor no longer maintains effective control over the assets. When the Corporation transfers financial assets and the transfer fails any one of the above criteria, the Corporation is prevented from derecognizing the transferred financial assets and the transaction is accounted for as a secured borrowing.
The Corporation recognizes and initially measures at fair value a servicing asset or servicing liability each time it undertakes an obligation to service a financial asset by entering into a servicing contract in either of the following situations: (1) a transfer of an entire financial asset, a group of entire financial assets, or a participating interest in an entire financial asset that meets the requirements for sale accounting; or (2) an acquisition or assumption of a servicing obligation of financial assets that do not pertain to the Corporation or its consolidated subsidiaries. Upon adoption of ASU 2009-16, the Corporation does not recognize either a servicing asset or a servicing liability if it transfers or securitizes financial assets in a transaction that does not meet the requirements for sale accounting and is accounted for as a secured borrowing.
Refer to Note 12 to the consolidated financial statements for disclosures on transfers of financial assets and servicing assets retained as part of guaranteed mortgage securitizations.
FASB Accounting Standards Update 2009-17, Consolidations (ASC Topic 810) — Improvements to Financial Reporting by Enterprises Involved with Variable Interest Entities (“ASU 2009-17”) and FASB Accounting Standards Update 2010-10, Consolidation (ASC Topic 810): Amendments for Certain Investment Funds (“ASU 2010-10”)
ASU 2009-17 amends the guidance applicable to variable interest entities (“VIEs”) and changes how a reporting entity determines when an entity that is insufficiently capitalized or is not controlled through voting (or similar rights) should be consolidated. This guidance replaces a quantitative-based risks and rewards calculation for determining which entity, if any, has both (a) a controlling financial interest in a VIE with an approach focused on identifying which entity has the power to direct the activities of a VIE that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance and (b) the obligation to absorb losses of the entity or the right to receive benefits from the entity that could potentially be significant to the VIE. This guidance requires reconsideration of whether an entity is a VIE when any changes in facts or circumstances occur such that the holders of the equity investment at risk, as a group, lose the power to direct the activities of the entity that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance. It also requires ongoing assessments of whether a variable interest holder is the primary beneficiary of a VIE. The amendments to the consolidated guidance affect all entities that were within the scope of the original guidance, as well as qualifying special-purpose entities (“QSPEs”) that were previously excluded from the guidance. ASU 2009-17 requires a reporting entity to provide additional disclosures about its involvement with VIEs and any significant changes in risk exposure due to that involvement. The Corporation adopted this new authoritative accounting guidance effective January 1, 2010. The new accounting guidance on VIEs did not have an effect on the Corporation’s consolidated statement of condition or results of operations upon adoption.
The principal VIEs evaluated by the Corporation during the nine months ended September 30, 2010 included: (1) GNMA and FNMA guaranteed mortgage securitizations and for which management has concluded that the Corporation is not the primary beneficiary (refer to Note 20 to the consolidated financial statements) and (2) the trust preferred securities for which management believes that the Corporation does not possess a significant variable interest on the trusts (refer to Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements).

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Additionally, the Corporation has variable interests in certain investments that have the attributes of investment companies, as well as limited partnership investments in venture capital companies. However, in January 2010, the FASB issued ASU 2010-10, Consolidation (ASC Topic 810), Amendments for Certain Investment Funds, which deferred the effective date of the provisions of ASU 2009-17 for a reporting entity’s interest in an entity that has all the attributes of an investment company; or for which it is industry practice to apply measurement principles for financial reporting purposes that are consistent with those followed by investment companies. The deferral allows asset managers that have no obligation to fund potentially significant losses of an investment entity to continue to apply the previous accounting guidance to investment entities that have the attributes of entities subject to ASC Topic 946 (the “Investment Company Guide”). The FASB also decided to defer the application of ASU 2009-17 for money market funds subject to Rule 2a-7 of the Investment Company Act of 1940. Asset managers would continue to apply the applicable existing guidance to those entities that qualify for the deferral. ASU 2010-10 did not defer the disclosure requirements in ASU 2009-17.
The Corporation was not required to consolidate existing VIEs for which it has a variable interest as of September 30, 2010. Refer to Note 20 to the consolidated financial statements for required disclosures associated with the guaranteed mortgage securitizations in which the Corporation holds a variable interest.
FASB Accounting Standards Update 2010-06, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures (ASC Topic 820) - Improving Disclosures about Fair Value Measurements (“ASU 2010-06”)
ASU 2010-06, issued in January 2010, revises two disclosure requirements concerning fair value measurements and clarifies two others. It requires separate presentation of significant transfers into and out of Levels 1 and 2 of the fair value hierarchy and disclosure of the reasons for such transfers. It will also require the presentation of purchases, sales, issuances and settlements within Level 3 on a gross basis rather than a net basis. The amendments also clarify that disclosures should be disaggregated by class of asset or liability and that disclosures about inputs and valuation techniques should be provided for both recurring and non-recurring fair value measurements. ASU 2010-06 has been effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2009, except for the disclosures about purchases, sales, issuances, and settlements in the rollforward of activity in Level 3 fair value measurements, which are effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2010. This guidance impacts disclosures only and will not have an effect on the Corporation’s consolidated statements of condition or results of operations. The Corporation’s disclosures about fair value measurements are presented in Note 21 to the consolidated financial statements.
FASB Accounting Standards Update 2010-11, Derivatives and Hedging (ASC Topic 815): Scope Exception Related to Embedded Credit Derivatives (“ASU 2010-11”)
ASU 2010-11 clarifies the type of embedded credit derivative that is exempt from embedded derivative bifurcation requirements. The type of credit derivative that qualifies for the exemption is related only to the subordination of one financial instrument to another. As a result, entities that have contracts containing an embedded credit derivative feature in a form other than such subordination may need to separately account for the embedded credit derivative feature. The amendments in ASU 2010-11 are effective for each reporting entity at the beginning of its first fiscal quarter beginning after June 15, 2010. The adoption of this standard in the third quarter of 2010 did not have a significant impact on the Corporation’s consolidated financial statements.
FASB Accounting Standards Update 2010-18, Receivables (ASC Topic 310): Effect of a Loan Modification When the Loan is Part of a Pool That is Accounted for as a Single Asset (“ASU 2010-18”)
The amendments in ASU 2010-18, issued in April 2010, affect any entity that acquires loans subject to ASC Subtopic 310-30, that accounts for some or all of those loans within pools, and that subsequently modifies one or more of those loans after acquisition. ASC Subtopic 310-30 provides guidance on accounting for acquired loans that have evidence of credit deterioration upon acquisition. As a result of the amendments in ASU 2010-18, modifications of loans that are accounted for within a pool under ASC Subtopic 310-30 do not result in the removal of those loans from the pool even if the modification of those loans would otherwise be considered a troubled debt restructuring. An entity will continue to be required to consider whether the pool of assets in which the loan is included is impaired if expected cash flows for the pool change. The amendments in ASU 2010-18 do not affect the accounting for loans under the scope of ASC Subtopic 310-30 that are not accounted for within pools. Loans

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accounted for individually under ASC Subtopic 310-30 continue to be subject to the troubled debt restructuring accounting provisions within ASC Subtopic 310-40, Receivables—Troubled Debt Restructurings by Creditors. The amendments in ASU 2010-18 are effective for modifications of loans accounted for within pools under ASC Subtopic 310-30 occurring in the first interim or annual period ending on or after July 15, 2010. The amendments are to be applied prospectively. Early application is permitted. Upon initial adoption of the guidance in ASU 2010-18, an entity may make a one-time election to terminate accounting for loans as a pool under ASC Subtopic 310-30. This election may be applied on a pool-by-pool basis and does not preclude an entity from applying pool accounting to subsequent acquisitions of loans with credit deterioration. The Corporation elected to early adopt the provisions of this statement, effective with the closing of the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction on April 30, 2010. As a result, the accounting for modified loans follows the guidelines of ASU 2010-18; however, the adoption of these provisions did not have a significant impact on the Corporation’s result of operations or financial position as of September 30, 2010.
FASB Accounting Standards Update 2010-20, Receivables (ASC Topic 310): Disclosure about the Credit Quality of Financing Receivables and the Allowance for Credit Losses (“ASU 2010-20”)
ASU 2010-20, issued in July 2010, expands disclosure requirements about the credit quality of financing receivables and allowance for credit losses. The objective of this ASU is for an entity to provide disclosures that facilitate financial statement users’ evaluation of the following: (1) the nature of credit risk inherent in the entity’s portfolio of financing receivables; (2) how that risk is analyzed and assessed in arriving at the allowance for credit losses; and (3) the changes and reasons for those changes in the allowance for credit losses. Disclosures should be provided on a disaggregated basis on two defined levels: (1) portfolio segment; and (2) class of financing receivable. The ASU 2010-20 makes changes to existing disclosure requirements and includes additional disclosure requirements about financing receivables, including: the credit quality indicators of financing receivables at the end of the reporting period by class of financing receivables; the aging of past due financing receivables at the end of the reporting period by class of financing receivables; and the nature and extent of troubled debt restructurings that occurred during the period by class of financing receivables and their effect on the allowance for credit losses. The disclosure requirements as of the end of a reporting period are effective for interim and annual reporting periods ending on or after December 15, 2010. The disclosures about activity that occurs during a reporting period are effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2010. This guidance impacts disclosures only and will not have an effect on the Corporation’s consolidated statements of condition or results of operations.
Note 6 — Discontinued Operations
In 2008, the Corporation discontinued the operations of Popular Financial Holdings (“PFH”) by selling assets and closing service branches and other units. The loss from discontinued operations for the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2009 was $3.4 million and $20.0 million, respectively, net of taxes. This loss was primarily related to salary and other expenses incurred in providing loan portfolio servicing to affiliated companies and other costs for FTEs that were retained for a transition period, as well as adjustments to indemnity reserves on loans previously sold.
Note 7 — Restrictions on Cash and Due from Banks and Certain Securities
The Corporation’s subsidiary banks are required by federal and state regulatory agencies to maintain average reserve balances with the Federal Reserve Bank or other banks. Those required average reserve balances were $828 million as of September 30, 2010 (December 31, 2009 — $721 million; September 30, 2009 — $705 million). Cash and due from banks as well as other short-term, highly-liquid securities are used to cover the required average reserve balances.
As required by the Puerto Rico International Banking Center Regulatory Act, as of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009, and September 30, 2009, the Corporation maintained separately for its two international banking entities (“IBEs”), $0.6 million in time deposits, equally divided for the two IBEs, which were considered restricted assets.
As part of a line of credit facility with a financial institution, as of December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009, the Corporation maintained restricted cash of $2 million as collateral for the line of credit. This restriction expired on July 2010.

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As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation maintained restricted cash of $6 million to support letters of credit (December 31, 2009 — $4 million; September 30, 2009 — $5 million).
As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation maintained restricted cash of $2 million that represents funds deposited in an escrow account which are guaranteeing possible liens or encumbrances over the title of insured properties.
As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation maintained restricted cash of $12 million to comply with the requirements of the credit card networks.
Note 8 — Pledged Assets
Certain securities, loans and other real estate owned were pledged principally to secure public and trust deposits, assets sold under agreements to repurchase, other borrowings and credit facilities available, derivative positions, loan servicing agreements and the loss sharing agreement with the FDIC.
The classification and carrying amount of the Corporation’s pledged assets, in which the secured parties are not permitted to sell or repledge the collateral, were as follows:
                         
    September 30,   December 31,   September 30,
(In thousands)   2010   2009   2009
 
Investment securities available-for-sale, at fair value
  $ 2,102,699     $ 1,923,338     $ 2,183,586  
Investment securities held-to-maturity, at amortized cost
    125,770       125,769       25,769  
Loans held-for-sale measured at lower of cost or fair value
    2,291       2,254       2,636  
Loans held-in-portfolio covered under loss sharing agreements with the FDIC
    3,966,574              
Loans held-in-portfolio not covered under loss sharing agreements with the FDIC
    9,646,035       8,993,967       8,406,876  
Other real estate covered under loss sharing agreements with the FDIC
    77,516              
 
Total pledged assets
  $ 15,920,885     $ 11,045,328     $ 10,618,867  
 
Pledged investment securities and loans in which the creditor has the right by custom or contract to repledge are presented separately in the consolidated statements of condition.
As of September 30, 2010, investment securities available-for-sale and held-to-maturity totaling $1.7 billion, and loans of $0.2 billion, served as collateral to secure public funds.
The Corporation’s banking subsidiaries have the ability to borrow funds from the Federal Home Loan Bank of New York (“FHLB) and from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (“Fed”). As of September 30, 2010, the banking subsidiaries had short-term and long-term credit facilities authorized with the FHLB aggregating $1.7 billion. Refer to Note 16 to the consolidated financial statements for borrowings outstanding under these credit facilities. As of September 30, 2010, the credit facilities authorized with the FHLB were collateralized by $3.7 billion in loans held-in-portfolio. Also, the Corporation’s banking subsidiaries had a borrowing capacity at the Fed discount window of $2.7 billion, which remained unused as of such date. The amount available under this credit facility is dependent upon the balance of loans and securities pledged as collateral. As of September 30, 2010, the credit facilities with the Fed discount window were collateralized by $5.7 billion in loans held-in-portfolio. These pledged assets are included in the above table and were not reclassified and separately reported in the consolidated statement of condition as of September 30, 2010.
Loans held-in-portfolio and other real estate owned that are covered by loss sharing agreements with the FDIC amounting to $4.0 billion as of September 30, 2010, serve as collateral to secure the note issued to the FDIC. Refer to Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements for descriptive information on the note issued to the FDIC.

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Note 9 — Investment Securities Available-For-Sale
The amortized cost, gross unrealized gains and losses, fair value and weighted average yield of investment securities available-for-sale as of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009 were as follows:
                                         
    AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2010
            Gross   Gross           Weighted
    Amortized   Unrealized   Unrealized   Fair   Average
(In thousands)   Cost   Gains   Losses   Value   Yield
 
U.S. Treasury securities
                                       
After 1 to 5 years
  $ 6,998     $ 166           $ 7,164       1.50 %
After 5 to 10 years
    28,850       3,409             32,259       3.81  
 
Total U.S. Treasury securities
    35,848       3,575             39,423       3.36  
 
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities
                                       
Within 1 year
    288,588       2,980             291,568       3.45  
After 1 to 5 years
    1,011,751       65,003             1,076,754       3.77  
After 5 to 10 years
    1,518       51             1,569       6.26  
After 10 years
    26,890       179             27,069       5.68  
 
Total obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities
    1,328,747       68,213             1,396,960       3.74  
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
                                       
Within 1 year
    10,140       18             10,158       3.90  
After 1 to 5 years
    15,858       375     $ 6       16,227       4.52  
After 5 to 10 years
    21,225       70       71       21,224       5.07  
After 10 years
    5,560       155             5,715       5.29  
 
Total obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
    52,783       618       77       53,324       4.70  
 
Collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
                                       
Within 1 year
    118       2             120       4.24  
After 1 to 5 years
    3,020       105             3,125       5.56  
After 5 to 10 years
    87,668       1,643             89,311       2.56  
After 10 years
    1,215,779       38,744       38       1,254,485       2.89  
 
Total collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
    1,306,585       40,494       38       1,347,041       2.87  
 
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
                                       
After 5 to 10 years
    13,612       86       444       13,254       1.71  
After 10 years
    85,796       202       3,862       82,136       2.32  
 
Total collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
    99,408       288       4,306       95,390       2.24  
 
Mortgage-backed securities — agencies
                                       
Within 1 year
    3,494       75             3,569       3.78  
After 1 to 5 years
    18,557       719             19,276       4.02  
After 5 to 10 years
    182,930       12,349       2       195,277       4.71  
After 10 years
    2,461,567       103,118       156       2,564,529       4.29  
 
Total mortgage-backed securities — agencies
    2,666,548       116,261       158       2,782,651       4.32  
 
Equity securities
    8,975       379       510       8,844       3.47  
 
Others
                                       
After 5 to 10 years
    17,850                   17,850       11.00  
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
  $ 5,516,744     $ 229,828     $ 5,089     $ 5,741,483       3.82 %
 

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    AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2009
            Gross   Gross           Weighted
    Amortized   Unrealized   Unrealized   Fair   Average
(In thousands)   Cost   Gains   Losses   Value   Yield
 
U.S. Treasury securities
                                       
After 5 to 10 years
  $ 29,359     $ 1,093           $ 30,452       3.80 %
 
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities
                                       
Within 1 year
    349,424       7,491             356,915       3.67  
After 1 to 5 years
    1,177,318       58,151             1,235,469       3.79  
After 5 to 10 years
    27,812       680             28,492       4.96  
After 10 years
    26,884       176             27,060       5.68  
 
Total obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities
    1,581,438       66,498             1,647,936       3.82  
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
                                       
After 1 to 5 years
    22,311       7     $ 15       22,303       6.92  
After 5 to 10 years
    50,910       249       632       50,527       5.08  
After 10 years
    7,840             61       7,779       5.26  
 
Total obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
    81,061       256       708       80,609       5.60  
 
Collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
                                       
Within 1 year
    41                   41       3.78  
After 1 to 5 years
    4,875       120             4,995       4.44  
After 5 to 10 years
    125,397       2,105       404       127,098       2.85  
After 10 years
    1,454,833       19,060       5,837       1,468,056       3.03  
 
Total collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
    1,585,146       21,285       6,241       1,600,190       3.02  
 
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
                                       
After 5 to 10 years
    20,885             653       20,232       2.00  
After 10 years
    105,669       109       8,452       97,326       2.59  
 
Total collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
    126,554       109       9,105       117,558       2.50  
 
Mortgage-backed securities — agencies
                                       
Within 1 year
    26,878       512             27,390       3.61  
After 1 to 5 years
    30,117       823             30,940       3.94  
After 5 to 10 years
    205,480       8,781             214,261       4.80  
After 10 years
    2,915,689       32,102       10,203       2,937,588       4.40  
 
Total mortgage-backed securities — agencies
    3,178,164       42,218       10,203       3,210,179       4.42  
 
Equity securities
    8,902       233       1,345       7,790       3.65  
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
  $ 6,590,624     $ 131,692     $ 27,602     $ 6,694,714       3.91 %
 

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    AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2009
            Gross   Gross           Weighted
    Amortized   Unrealized   Unrealized   Fair   Average
(In thousands)   Cost   Gains   Losses   Value   Yield
 
U.S. Treasury securities
                                       
After 5 to 10 years
  $ 29,528     $ 1,608           $ 31,136       3.80 %
 
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities
                                       
Within 1 year
    184,261       4,176             188,437       3.81  
After 1 to 5 years
    1,377,705       71,690             1,449,395       3.73  
After 5 to 10 years
    27,812       952             28,764       5.01  
After 10 years
    26,882       800             27,682       5.68  
 
Total obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities
    1,616,660       77,618             1,694,278       3.79  
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
                                       
Within 1 year
    5                   5       3.88  
After 1 to 5 years
    12,375       10     $ 108       12,277       3.40  
After 5 to 10 years
    50,969       292       2,264       48,997       5.08  
After 10 years
    27,905             201       27,704       5.26  
 
Total obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
    91,254       302       2,573       88,983       4.91  
 
Collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
                                       
Within 1 year
    154       1             155       4.08  
After 1 to 5 years
    3,578       109             3,687       4.43  
After 5 to 10 years
    138,044       2,578       408       140,214       2.94  
After 10 years
    1,438,743       26,787       11,623       1,453,907       2.98  
 
Total collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
    1,580,519       29,475       12,031       1,597,963       2.98  
 
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
                                       
Within 1 year
    106                   106       3.39  
After 5 to 10 years
    23,481       14       580       22,915       2.10  
After 10 years
    115,763             11,988       103,775       2.65  
 
Total collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
    139,350       14       12,568       126,796       2.56  
 
Mortgage-backed securities — agencies
                                       
Within 1 year
    9,072       118       21       9,169       3.07  
After 1 to 5 years
    62,462       1,431             63,893       3.92  
After 5 to 10 years
    178,392       9,283             187,675       4.86  
After 10 years
    3,136,807       47,982       231       3,184,558       4.48  
 
Total mortgage-backed securities — agencies
    3,386,733       58,814       252       3,445,295       4.49  
 
Equity securities
    9,606       171       937       8,840       3.39  
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
  $ 6,853,650     $ 168,002     $ 28,361     $ 6,993,291       3.94 %
 

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The following table shows the Corporation’s fair value and gross unrealized losses of investment securities available-for-sale, aggregated by investment category and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position as of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009.
                                                 
    AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2010
    Less than 12 months   12 months or more   Total
 
            Gross           Gross           Gross
            Unrealized   Fair   Unrealized           Unrealized
(In thousands)   Fair Value   Losses   Value   Losses   Fair Value   Losses
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
  $ 18,234     $ 71     $ 302     $ 6     $ 18,536     $ 77  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
    13,880       35       6,402       3       20,282       38  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
    1,551       94       68,032       4,212       69,583       4,306  
Mortgage-backed securities — agencies
    8,915       123       1,240       35       10,155       158  
Equity securities
    3       8       3,846       502       3,849       510  
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale in an unrealized loss position
  $ 42,583     $ 331     $ 79,822     $ 4,758     $ 122,405     $ 5,089  
 
                                                 
    AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2009
    Less than 12 months   12 months or more   Total
 
            Gross           Gross           Gross
            Unrealized   Fair   Unrealized           Unrealized
(In thousands)   Fair Value   Losses   Value   Losses   Fair Value   Losses
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
  $ 2,387     $ 8     $ 63,429     $ 700     $ 65,816     $ 708  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
    298,917       3,667       359,214       2,574       658,131       6,241  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
    6,716       18       97,904       9,087       104,620       9,105  
Mortgage-backed securities — agencies
    905,028       10,130       3,566       73       908,594       10,203  
Equity securities
    2,347       981       3,898       364       6,245       1,345  
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale in an unrealized loss position
  $ 1,215,395     $ 14,804     $ 528,011     $ 12,798     $ 1,743,406     $ 27,602  
 
                                                 
    AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2009
    Less than 12 months   12 months or more   Total
 
            Gross           Gross           Gross
            Unrealized   Fair   Unrealized           Unrealized
(In thousands)   Fair Value   Losses   Value   Losses   Fair Value   Losses
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
  $ 26,299     $ 166     $ 58,123     $ 2,407     $ 84,422     $ 2,573  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
    137,288       3,902       486,652       8,129       623,940       12,031  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
    3,935       331       114,635       12,237       118,570       12,568  
Mortgage-backed securities — agencies
    51,648       71       11,949       181       63,597       252  
Equity securities
    2,749       579       3,839       358       6,588       937  
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale in an unrealized loss position
  $ 221,919     $ 5,049     $ 675,198     $ 23,312     $ 897,117     $ 28,361  
 

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Management evaluates investment securities for other-than-temporary (“OTTI”) declines in fair value on a quarterly basis. Once a decline in value is determined to be other-than-temporary, the value of a debt security is reduced and a corresponding charge to earnings is recognized for anticipated credit losses. Also, for equity securities that are considered other-than-temporarily impaired, the excess of the security’s carrying value over its fair value at the evaluation date is accounted for as a loss in the results of operations. The OTTI analysis requires management to consider various factors, which include, but are not limited to: (1) the length of time and the extent to which fair value has been less than the amortized cost basis, (2) the financial condition of the issuer or issuers, (3) actual collateral attributes, (4) the payment structure of the debt security and the likelihood of the issuer being able to make payments, (5) any rating changes by a rating agency, (6) adverse conditions specifically related to the security, industry, or a geographic area, and (7) management’s intent to sell the debt security or whether it is more likely than not that the Corporation would be required to sell the debt security before a forecasted recovery occurs.
As of September 30, 2010, management performed its quarterly analysis of all debt securities in an unrealized loss position. Based on the analyses performed, management concluded that no individual debt security was other-than-temporarily impaired as of such date. As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation does not have the intent to sell debt securities in an unrealized loss position and it is not more likely than not that the Corporation will have to sell the investment securities prior to recovery of their amortized cost basis. Also, management evaluated the Corporation’s portfolio of equity securities as of September 30, 2010. During the quarter ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation did not record any other-than-temporary impairment losses on equity securities. Management has the intent and ability to hold the investments in equity securities that are at a loss position as of September 30, 2010 for a reasonable period of time for a forecasted recovery of fair value up to (or beyond) the cost of these investments.
The unrealized losses associated with “Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label” are primarily related to securities backed by residential mortgages. In addition to verifying the credit ratings for the private-label CMOs, management analyzed the underlying mortgage loan collateral for these bonds. Various statistics or metrics were reviewed for each private-label CMO, including among others, the weighted average loan-to-value, FICO score, and delinquency and foreclosure rates of the underlying assets in the securities. As of September 30, 2010, there were no “sub-prime” securities in the Corporation’s private-label CMOs portfolios. For private-label CMOs with unrealized losses as of September 30, 2010, credit impairment was assessed using a cash flow model that estimates the cash flows on the underlying mortgages, using the security-specific collateral and transaction structure. The model estimates cash flows from the underlying mortgage loans and distributes those cash flows to various tranches of securities, considering the transaction structure and any subordination and credit enhancements that exist in that structure. The cash flow model incorporates actual cash flows through the current period and then projects the expected cash flows using a number of assumptions, including default rates, loss severity and prepayment rates. Management’s assessment also considered tests using more stressful parameters. Based on the assessments, management concluded that the tranches of the private-label CMOs held by the Corporation were not other-than-temporarily impaired as of September 30, 2010, thus management expects to recover the amortized cost basis of the securities.
Proceeds from the sale of investment securities available-for-sale during the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2010 amounted to $377.2 million and $396.7 million; respectively. Gains of $3.7 million were realized during the quarter and year-to-date periods ended September 30, 2010 related to the sale during this quarter of investment securities available-for-sale. This compares with proceeds of $77.9 million and $3.8 billion respectively, and realized net gains of $198 thousand and $184.3 million respectively, for the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2009.

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The following table states the names of issuers and the aggregate amortized cost and fair value of the securities of such issuer (includes available-for-sale and held-to-maturity securities), in which the aggregate amortized cost of such securities exceeds 10% of stockholders’ equity. This information excludes securities of the U.S. Government agencies and corporations. Investments in obligations issued by a State of the U.S. and its political subdivisions and agencies, which are payable and secured by the same source of revenue or taxing authority, other than the U.S. Government, are considered securities of a single issuer.
                                                 
    September 30, 2010   December 31, 2009   September 30, 2009
(In thousands)   Amortized Cost   Fair Value   Amortized Cost   Fair Value   Amortized Cost   Fair Value
 
FNMA
  $ 792,291     $ 826,042     $ 970,744     $ 991,825     $ 1,067,001     $ 1,089,443  
FHLB
    1,173,877       1,238,487       1,385,535       1,449,454       1,395,778       1,469,493  
Freddie Mac
    602,440       620,384       959,316       971,556       997,716       1,012,276  
 

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Note 10 — Investment Securities Held-to-Maturity
The amortized cost, gross unrealized gains and losses, fair value and weighted average yield of investment securities held-to-maturity as of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009 were as follows:
                                         
    AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2010
            Gross   Gross           Weighted
    Amortized   Unrealized   Unrealized   Fair   Average
(In thousands)   Cost   Gains   Losses   Value   Yield
 
U.S. Treasury securities
                                       
Within 1 year
  $ 25,812     $ 2           $ 25,814       0.21 %
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
                                       
Within 1 year
    7,150       14             7,164       2.15  
After 1 to 5 years
    110,528       620             111,148       5.52  
After 5 to 10 years
    17,595       506     $ 52       18,049       5.96  
After 10 years
    49,300       231       652       48,879       4.20  
 
Total obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
    184,573       1,371       704       185,240       5.08  
 
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
                                       
After 10 years
    192             11       181       5.21  
 
Others
                                       
Within 1 year
    3,075                   3,075       1.33  
After 1 to 5 years
    500             7       493       1.00  
 
Total others
    3,575             7       3,568       1.28  
 
Total investment securities held-to-maturity
  $ 214,152     $ 1,373     $ 722     $ 214,803       4.43 %
 
 
                                       
    AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2009
            Gross   Gross           Weighted
    Amortized   Unrealized   Unrealized   Fair   Average
(In thousands)   Cost   Gains   Losses   Value   Yield
 
U.S. Treasury securities
                                       
Within 1 year
  $ 25,777     $ 4           $ 25,781       0.11 %
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
                                       
Within 1 year
    7,015       6             7,021       2.04  
After 1 to 5 years
    109,415       3,157     $ 6       112,566       5.51  
After 5 to 10 years
    17,112       39       452       16,699       5.79  
After 10 years
    48,600             2,552       46,048       4.00  
 
Total obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
    182,142       3,202       3,010       182,334       5.00  
 
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
                                       
After 10 years
    220             12       208       5.45  
 
Others
                                       
Within 1 year
    3,573                   3,573       3.77  
After 1 to 5 years
    1,250                   1,250       1.66  
 
Total others
    4,823                   4,823       3.22  
 
Total investment securities held-to-maturity
  $ 212,962     $ 3,206     $ 3,022     $ 213,146       4.37 %
 

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    AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2009
            Gross   Gross           Weighted
    Amortized   Unrealized   Unrealized   Fair   Average
(In thousands)   Cost   Gains   Losses   Value   Yield
 
U.S. Treasury securities
                                       
Within 1 year
  $ 25,769           $ 6     $ 25,763       0.11 %
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
                                       
Within 1 year
    7,015     $ 7             7,022       4.30  
After 1 to 5 years
    109,415       2,349       47       111,717       5.51  
After 5 to 10 years
    17,107       52       878       16,281       5.79  
After 10 years
    48,600             3,502       45,098       4.12  
 
Total obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
    182,137       2,408       4,427       180,118       5.12  
 
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
                                       
After 10 years
    222             12       210       5.45  
 
Others
                                       
Within 1 year
    3,572                   3,572       3.11  
After 1 to 5 years
    1,250                   1,250       1.66  
 
Total others
    4,822                   4,822       2.73  
 
Total investment securities held-to-maturity
  $ 212,950     $ 2,408     $ 4,445     $ 210,913       4.46 %
 
The following table shows the Corporation’s fair value and gross unrealized losses of investment securities held-to-maturity, aggregated by investment category and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position as of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009:
                                                 
    AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2010
    Less than 12 months   12 months or more   Total
            Gross           Gross           Gross
            Unrealized   Fair   Unrealized           Unrealized
(In thousands)   Fair Value   Losses   Value   Losses   Fair Value   Losses
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
              $ 31,126     $ 704     $ 31,126     $ 704  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
                181       11       181       11  
Others
  $ 243     $ 7                   243       7  
 
Total investment securities held-to-maturity in an unrealized loss position
  $ 243     $ 7     $ 31,307     $ 715     $ 31,550     $ 722  
 
 
                                               
    AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2009
    Less than 12 months   12 months or more   Total
            Gross           Gross           Gross
            Unrealized   Fair   Unrealized           Unrealized
(In thousands)   Fair Value   Losses   Value   Losses   Fair Value   Losses
 
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
  $ 21,187     $ 1,908     $ 37,718     $ 1,102     $ 58,905     $ 3,010  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
                208       12       208       12  
 
Total investment securities held-to-maturity in an unrealized loss position
  $ 21,187     $ 1,908     $ 37,926     $ 1,114     $ 59,113     $ 3,022  
 
   
    AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2009
    Less than 12 months   12 months or more   Total
            Gross           Gross           Gross
            Unrealized   Fair   Unrealized           Unrealized
(In thousands)   Fair Value   Losses   Value   Losses   Fair Value   Losses
 
U.S. Treasury securities
  $ 25,763     $ 6                 $ 25,763     $ 6  
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
    42,995       3,990     $ 19,493     $ 437       62,488       4,427  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
                210       12       210       12  
Others
                250             250        
 
Total investment securities held-to-maturity in an unrealized loss position
  $ 68,758     $ 3,996     $ 19,953     $ 449     $ 88,711     $ 4,445  
 

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As indicated in Note 9 to these consolidated financial statements, management evaluates investment securities for other-than-temporary (“OTTI”) declines in fair value on a quarterly basis.
The “Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions” classified as held-to-maturity as of September 30, 2010 are primarily associated with securities issued by municipalities of Puerto Rico and are generally not rated by a credit rating agency. The Corporation performs periodic credit quality reviews on these issuers. The decline in fair value as of September 30, 2010 was attributable to changes in interest rates and not credit quality; thus no other-than-temporary decline in value was recorded in these held-to-maturity securities. As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation does not have the intent to sell securities held-to-maturity and it is not more likely than not that the Corporation will have to sell these investment securities prior to recovery of their amortized cost basis.
Note 11 — Loans Held-in-Portfolio and Allowance for Loan Losses
Because of the loss protection provided by the FDIC, the risks of the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction acquired loans are significantly different from those loans not covered under the FDIC loss sharing agreements. Accordingly, the Corporation presents loans subject to the loss sharing agreements as “covered loans” in the information below and loans that are not subject to the FDIC loss sharing agreements as “non-covered loans”.
The composition of loans held-in-portfolio (“HIP”) as of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009, and September 30, 2009 was as follows:
                                         
    Non-covered   Covered   Total loans HIP        
    loans as of   loans as of   as of September 30,   December 31,   September 30,
(In thousands)   September 30, 2010   September 30, 2010   2010   2009   2009
 
Commercial
  $ 11,719,127     $ 2,382,102     $ 14,101,229     $ 12,664,059     $ 13,075,868  
Construction
    1,299,929       287,159       1,587,088       1,724,373       1,882,069  
Lease financing
    613,560             613,560       675,629       699,350  
Mortgage
    4,750,068       1,166,837       5,916,905       4,603,245       4,547,372  
Consumer
    3,759,798       170,129       3,929,927       4,045,807       4,191,410  
 
Total loans HIP
  $ 22,142,482     $ 4,006,227     $ 26,148,709     $ 23,713,113     $ 24,396,069  
 
The following table presents acquired loans accounted for pursuant to ASC Subtopic 310-30 as of the April 30, 2010 acquisition date:
         
(In thousands)        
 
Contractually-required principal and interest
  $ 10,995,387  
Non-accretable difference
    5,789,480  
 
Cash flows expected to be collected
    5,205,907  
Accretable yield
    1,303,908  
 
Fair value of loans accounted for under ASC Subtopic 310-30
  $ 3,901,999 [1]
 
[1]   Reflects a difference of $11.4 million compared with the amounts disclosed in the Form 8-K/A filed on July 16, 2010, which included the financial statements and exhibits pertaining to the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction at the acquisition date. The Corporation reassessed the classification of certain acquired loans and, due to their revolving characteristics, reclassified the loans for accounting purposes from ASC Subtopic 310-30 to ASC Subtopic 310-20. The reclassification did not impact the fair value of the loans.
 
The cash flows expected to be collected consider the estimated remaining life of the underlying loans and include the effects of estimated prepayments. The unpaid principal balance of the acquired loans from the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction that are accounted under ASC Subtopic 310-30 amounted to $7.8 billion as of the April 30, 2010 transaction date.

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Changes in the carrying amount and the accretable yield for the acquired loans in the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction as of and for the nine-month period ended September 30, 2010, and which are accounted pursuant to the ASC Subtopic 310-30, were as follows:
                 
            Carrying amount  
(In thousands)   Accretable yield     of loans  
 
Balance as of January 1, 2010
           
Additions [1]
  $ 1,303,908     $ 3,901,999  
Accretion
    (95,506 )     95,506  
Payments received
            (338,308 )
 
Balance as of September 30, 2010
  $ 1,208,402     $ 3,659,197  
 
[1]   Represents the estimated fair value of the loans at the date of acquisition. There were no reclassifications from non-accretable difference to accretable yield from April 30, 2010 to September 30, 2010.
 
As of September 30, 2010, none of the acquired loans accounted under ASC Subtopic 310-30 were considered non-performing loans. Therefore, interest income, through accretion of the difference between the carrying amount of the loans and the expected cash flows, was recognized on all acquired loans.
As indicated in Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements, the Corporation accounts for lines of credit with revolving privileges under the accounting guidance of ASC Subtopic 310-20, which requires that any differences between the contractually required loan payment receivable in excess of the initial investment in the loans be accreted into interest income over the life of the loan, if the loan is accruing interest. The following table presents acquired loans accounted for under ASC Subtopic 310-20 as of the April 30, 2010 acquisition date:
         
(In thousands)        
 
Fair value of loans accounted under ASC Subtopic 310-20
  $ 358,989 [1]
 
Gross contractual amounts receivable (principal and interest)
  $ 1,007,880  
 
Estimate of contractual cash flows not expected to be collected
  $ 614,653  
 
[1]   Reflects a difference of $11.4 million compared with the amounts disclosed in the Form 8-K/A filed on July 16, 2010, which included the financial statements and exhibits pertaining to the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction at the acquisition date. The Corporation reassessed the classification of certain acquired loans and, due to their revolving characteristics, reclassified the loans for accounting purposes from ASC Subtopic 310-30 to ASC Subtopic 310-20. The reclassification did not impact the fair value of the loans.
 
The cash flows expected to be collected consider the estimated remaining life of the underlying loans and include the effects of estimated prepayments. The unpaid principal balance of the acquired loans from the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction that are accounted pursuant to ASC Subtopic 310-20 amounted to $739 million as of the April 30, 2010 transaction date.
There was no need to record an allowance for loan losses related to the covered loans as of September 30, 2010.
The activity in the allowance for loan losses for the nine-month period ended September 30, 2010 and 2009 is summarized as follows:
                 
(In thousands)   2010   2009
 
Balance as of January 1
  $ 1,261,204     $ 882,807  
Provision for loan losses
    657,471       1,053,036  
Loan charge-offs
    (750,609 )     (776,119 )
Loan recoveries
    75,928       47,677  
 
Balance as of September 30
  $ 1,243,994     $ 1,207,401  
 
Note 12 — Transfers of Financial Assets and Mortgage Servicing Rights
The Corporation typically transfers conforming residential mortgage loans in conjunction with GNMA and FNMA securitization transactions whereby the loans are exchanged for cash or securities and servicing rights. The securities issued through these transactions are guaranteed by the corresponding agency and, as such, under seller/servicer agreements the Corporation is required to service the loans in accordance with the agencies’ servicing guidelines and standards. Substantially all mortgage loans securitized by the Corporation in GNMA and FNMA securities have fixed rates and represent conforming loans. As seller, the Corporation has made certain representations and

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warranties with respect to the originally transferred loans and, in some instances, has sold loans with credit recourse to a government-sponsored entity, namely FNMA. Refer to Note 19 to the consolidated financial statements for a description of such arrangements.
During the nine months ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation retained servicing rights on guaranteed mortgage securitizations (FNMA and GNMA) and whole loan sales involving approximately $697 million in principal balance outstanding (September 30, 2009 — $1.2 billion). During the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation recognized net gains of approximately $3.8 million and $12.6 million, respectively, on these transactions (September 30, 2009 — $6.4 million for the quarter and $32.8 million for the nine-month period). All loan sales or securitizations performed during the nine months ended September 30, 2010 were without credit recourse arrangements.
During the quarter ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation obtained as proceeds $227 million of assets as a result of securitization transactions with FNMA and GNMA, consisting of $223 million in mortgage-backed securities and $4 million in servicing rights. During the nine months ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation obtained as proceeds $645 million of assets as a result of securitization transactions with FNMA and GNMA, consisting of $634 million in mortgage-backed securities and $11 million in servicing rights. No liabilities were incurred as a result of these transfers during the quarter and nine month-period ended September 30, 2010 because they did not contain any credit recourse arrangements. The Corporation recorded a net gain of $3.0 million and $13.2 million, respectively, during the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2010 related to these residential mortgage loans securitized.
The following tables present the initial fair value of the assets obtained as proceeds from residential mortgage loans securitized during the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2010.
                                 
    Proceeds Obtained During the Quarter Ended September 30, 2010  
(In thousands)   Level 1     Level 2     Level 3     Initial Fair Value  
 
Assets
                               
Investment securities available-for-sale:
                               
Mortgage-backed securities — GNMA
                       
Mortgage-backed securities — FNMA
                           
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
                       
 
Trading account securities:
                               
Mortgage-backed securities — GNMA
        $ 168,622           $ 168,622  
Mortgage-backed securities — FNMA
          54,136             54,136  
 
Total trading account securities
        $ 222,758           $ 222,758  
 
Mortgage servicing rights
              $ 3,932     $ 3,932  
 
Total
        $ 222,758     $ 3,932     $ 226,690  
 
 
    Proceeds Obtained During the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2010  
(In thousands)   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Initial Fair Value
 
Assets
                               
Investment securities available-for-sale:
                               
Mortgage-backed securities — GNMA
        $ 2,810           $ 2,810  
Mortgage-backed securities — FNMA
                       
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
        $ 2,810           $ 2,810  
 
Trading account securities:
                               
Mortgage-backed securities — GNMA
        $ 496,223     $ 4,147     $ 500,370  
Mortgage-backed securities — FNMA
          130,641             130,641  
 
Total trading account securities
        $ 626,864     $ 4,147     $ 631,011  
 
Mortgage servicing rights
              $ 11,467     $ 11,467  
 
Total
        $ 629,674     $ 15,614     $ 645,288  
 
Refer to Note 21 to the consolidated financial statements for key inputs, assumptions, and valuation techniques used to measure the fair value of these mortgage-backed securities and mortgage servicing rights.

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Mortgage servicing rights
The Corporation recognizes as assets the rights to service loans for others, whether these rights are purchased or result from asset transfers such as sales and securitizations.
Classes of mortgage servicing rights were determined based on the different markets or types of assets being serviced. The Corporation recognizes the servicing rights of its banking subsidiaries that are related to residential mortgage loans as a class of servicing rights. These mortgage servicing rights (“MSRs”) are measured at fair value. Fair value determination is performed on a subsidiary basis, with assumptions varying in accordance with the types of assets or markets served.
The Corporation uses a discounted cash flow model to estimate the fair value of MSRs. The discounted cash flow model incorporates assumptions that market participants would use in estimating future net servicing income, including estimates of prepayment speeds, discount rate, cost to service, escrow account earnings, contractual servicing fee income, prepayment and late fees, among other considerations. Prepayment speeds are adjusted for the Corporation’s loan characteristics and portfolio behavior.
The following table presents the changes in residential MSRs measured using the fair value method for the nine months ended September 30, 2010 and September 30, 2009.
                 
(In thousands)   2010   2009
 
Fair value as of January 1
  $ 169,747     $ 176,034  
Purchases
    4,250       1,029  
Servicing from securitizations or asset transfers
    11,909       19,640  
Changes due to payments on loans [1]
    (11,990 )     (10,750 )
Changes in fair value due to changes in valuation model inputs or assumptions
    (7,969 )     (5,618 )
 
Fair value as of September 30
  $ 165,947     $ 180,335  
 
[1]   Represents changes due to collection / realization of expected cash flows over time.
 
Residential mortgage loans serviced for others were $18.0 billion as of September 30, 2010 (December 31, 2009 — $17.7 billion; September 30, 2009 — $17.7 billion).
Net mortgage servicing fees, a component of other service fees in the consolidated statements of operations, include the changes from period to period in the fair value of the MSRs, which may result from changes in the valuation model inputs or assumptions (principally reflecting changes in discount rates and prepayment speed assumptions) and other changes, including changes due to collection / realization of expected cash flows. Mortgage servicing fees, excluding fair value adjustments, for the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2010 amounted to $11.7 million and $35.4 million, respectively (September 30, 2009 — $11.7 million and $34.7 million, respectively). The banking subsidiaries receive servicing fees based on a percentage of the outstanding loan balance. As of September 30, 2010, those weighted average mortgage servicing fees were 0.27% (September 30, 2009 — 0.26%). Under these servicing agreements, the banking subsidiaries do not generally earn significant prepayment penalty fees on the underlying loans serviced.
The discussion that follows includes information on assumptions used in the valuation model of the MSRs, originated and purchased.
Key economic assumptions used in measuring the servicing rights retained at the date of the residential mortgage loan securitizations and whole loan sales by the banking subsidiaries during the quarter ended September 30, 2010 and year ended December 31, 2009 were as follows:
                 
    September 30, 2010   December 31, 2009
 
Prepayment speed
    5.0 %     7.8 %
Weighted average life
  20.1 years   12.8 years
Discount rate (annual rate)
    11.5 %     11.0 %
 

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Key economic assumptions used to estimate the fair value of MSRs derived from sales and securitizations of mortgage loans performed by the banking subsidiaries and the sensitivity to immediate changes in those assumptions as of September 30, 2010 and December 31, 2009 were as follows:
                 
    Originated MSRs
(In thousands)   September 30, 2010   December 31, 2009
 
Fair value of retained interests
  $ 98,966     $ 97,870  
Weighted average life
  11.2 years   8.8 years
Weighted average prepayment speed (annual rate)
    9.0 %     11.4 %
Impact on fair value of 10% adverse change
    ($3,386 )     ($3,182 )
Impact on fair value of 20% adverse change
    ($6,684 )     ($7,173 )
Weighted average discount rate (annual rate)
    12.80 %     12.41 %
Impact on fair value of 10% adverse change
    ($4,062 )     ($2,715 )
Impact on fair value of 20% adverse change
    ($7,911 )     ($6,240 )
The banking subsidiaries also own servicing rights purchased from other financial institutions. The fair value of purchased MSRs, their related valuation assumptions and the sensitivity to immediate changes in those assumptions as of period end were as follows:
                 
    Purchased MSRs
(In thousands)   September 30, 2010   December 31, 2009
 
Fair value of retained interests
  $ 66,981     $ 71,877  
Weighted average life
  12.1 years   9.9 years
Weighted average prepayment speed (annual rate)
    8.3 %     10.1 %
Impact on fair value of 10% adverse change
    ($2,636 )     ($2,697 )
Impact on fair value of 20% adverse change
    ($4,655 )     ($5,406 )
Weighted average discount rate (annual rate)
    11.6 %     11.1 %
Impact on fair value of 10% adverse change
    ($2,923 )     ($2,331 )
Impact on fair value of 20% adverse change
    ($5,180 )     ($4,681 )
The sensitivity analyses presented in the tables above for servicing rights are hypothetical and should be used with caution. As the figures indicate, changes in fair value based on a 10 and 20 percent variation in assumptions generally cannot be extrapolated because the relationship of the change in assumption to the change in fair value may not be linear. Also, in the sensitivity tables included herein, the effect of a variation in a particular assumption on the fair value of the retained interest is calculated without changing any other assumption. In reality, changes in one factor may result in changes in another (for example, increases in market interest rates may result in lower prepayments and increased credit losses), which might magnify or counteract the sensitivities.
As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation serviced $4.1 billion (December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009 — $4.5 billion) in residential mortgage loans with credit recourse to the Corporation.
Under the GNMA securitizations, the Corporation has the right to repurchase, at its option and without GNMA’s prior authorization, any loan that is collateral for a GNMA guaranteed mortgage-backed security when certain delinquency criteria are met. At the time that individual loans meet GNMA’s specified delinquency criteria and are eligible for repurchase, the Corporation is deemed to have regained effective control over these loans. As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation had recorded $163 million in mortgage loans on its financial statements related to this buy-back option program (December 31, 2009 — $124 million; September 30, 2009 — $112 million).

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Note 13 — Other Assets
The caption of other assets in the consolidated statements of condition consists of the following major categories:
                         
    September 30,   December 31,   September 30,
(In thousands)   2010   2009   2009
 
Net deferred tax assets (net of valuation allowance)
  $ 336,661     $ 363,967     $ 380,596  
Investments under the equity method
    292,493       99,772       97,817  
Bank-owned life insurance program
    236,824       232,387       230,579  
Prepaid FDIC insurance assessment
    164,190       206,308        
Other prepaid expenses
    91,193       130,762       144,949  
Derivative assets
    85,180       71,822       81,249  
Trade receivables from brokers and counterparties
    37,996       1,104       8,275  
Others
    215,448       218,795       213,256  
 
Total other assets
  $ 1,459,985     $ 1,324,917     $ 1,156,721  
 
Note 14 — Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets
The changes in the carrying amount of goodwill for the nine months ended September 30, 2010 and 2009, allocated by reportable segments and corporate group, were as follows (refer to Note 29 for the definition of the Corporation’s reportable segments):
                                         
2010
    Balance as of   Goodwill   Purchase accounting           Balance as of
(In thousands)   January 1, 2010   on acquisition   adjustments   Other   September 30, 2010
 
Banco Popular de Puerto Rico
  $ 157,025     $ 106,230                 $ 263,255  
Banco Popular North America
    402,078                         402,078  
Corporate
    45,246                   ($45,246 )      
 
Total Popular, Inc.
  $ 604,349     $ 106,230             ($45,246 )   $ 665,333  
 
                                         
2009
    Balance as of   Goodwill   Purchase accounting           Balance as of
(In thousands)   January 1, 2009   on acquisition   adjustments   Other   September 30, 2009
 
Banco Popular de Puerto Rico
  $ 157,059             ($34 )         $ 157,025  
Banco Popular North America
    404,237                         404,237  
Corporate
    44,496             750             45,246  
 
Total Popular, Inc.
  $ 605,792           $ 716           $ 606,508  
 
The goodwill recognized in the BPPR reportable segment during 2010 relates to the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction. Refer to Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements for further information on the accounting for the transaction and the resulting goodwill recognition. The fair values initially assigned to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction are subject to refinement for up to one year after the closing date of the acquisition as new information relative to closing date fair values becomes available. Any changes in such fair value estimates may impact the goodwill initially recorded.
On September 30, 2010, the Corporation completed the sale of the processing and technology business, which resulted in a $45 million reduction of goodwill for the Corporation. See Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements for further information regarding the sale. The goodwill from EVERTEC was included in the Corporate group since EVERTEC is no longer considered a reportable segment as discussed in Note 29 to the consolidated financial statements.

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The gross amount of goodwill and accumulated impairment losses at the beginning and the end of the quarter by reportable segment and Corporate group were as follows:
                                                 
2010
    Balance at January           Balance at January   Balance at           Balance at
    1, 2010 (Gross   Accumulated   1, 2010 (Net   September 30, 2010   Accumulated   September 30, 2010
(In thousands)   amounts)   Impairment Losses   amounts)   (Gross amounts)   Impairment Losses   (Net amounts)
 
Banco Popular de Puerto Rico
  $ 157,025           $ 157,025     $ 263,255           $ 263,255  
Banco Popular North America
    566,489     $ 164,411       402,078       566,489     $ 164,411       402,078  
Corporate
    45,429       183       45,246                    
 
Total Popular, Inc.
  $ 768,943     $ 164,594     $ 604,349     $ 829,744     $ 164,411     $ 665,333  
 
                                                 
2009
    Balance at January           Balance at January   Balance at           Balance at
    1, 2009 (Gross   Accumulated   1, 2009 (Net   September 30, 2009   Accumulated   September 30, 2009
(In thousands)   amounts)   Impairment Losses   amounts)   (Gross amounts)   Impairment Losses   (Net amounts)
 
Banco Popular de Puerto Rico
  $ 157,059           $ 157,059     $ 157,025           $ 157,025  
Banco Popular North America
    568,648     $ 164,411       404,237       568,648     $ 164,411       404,237  
Corporate
    44,679       183       44,496       45,429       183       45,246  
 
Total Popular, Inc.
  $ 770,386     $ 164,594     $ 605,792     $ 771,102     $ 164,594     $ 606,508  
 
The accumulated impairment losses in the BPNA reportable segment are associated with E-LOAN.
As of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009, the Corporation had $6 million of identifiable intangible assets, other than goodwill, with indefinite useful lives.
The following table reflects the components of other intangible assets subject to amortization:
                                                 
    September 30, 2010   December 31, 2009   September 30, 2009
    Gross   Accumulated   Gross   Accumulated   Gross   Accumulated
(In thousands)   Amount   Amortization   Amount   Amortization   Amount   Amortization
 
Core deposits
  $ 80,591     $ 27,721     $ 65,379     $ 30,991     $ 65,379     $ 29,276  
Other customer relationships
    4,719       3,291       8,816       5,804       8,816       5,478  
Other intangibles
    125       99       125       71       2,787       2,509  
 
Total
  $ 85,435     $ 31,111     $ 74,320     $ 36,866     $ 76,982     $ 37,263  
 
During the nine months ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation recognized $24 million in a core deposit intangible asset associated with the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction. This core deposit intangible asset is to be amortized to operating expenses ratably on a monthly basis over a 10-year period.
Certain core deposits and other customer relationships intangibles with a gross amount of $9 million and $0.8 million respectively, became fully amortized during the nine months ended September 30, 2010, and, as such, their gross amount and accumulated amortization were eliminated from the tabular disclosure presented above. The decrease in other customer relationships category was associated to the sale of the ownership interest in EVERTEC described in Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements.
During the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation recognized $2.4 million and $6.9 million, respectively, in amortization related to other intangible assets with definite useful lives (September 30, 2009 — $2.4 million and $7.2 million, respectively).

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The following table presents the estimated amortization of the intangible assets with definite useful lives for each of the following periods:
         
(In thousands)        
 
Remaining 2010
  $ 2,242  
Year 2011
    8,936  
Year 2012
    8,409  
Year 2013
    8,225  
Year 2014
    7,587  
Year 2015
    5,478  
 
Results of the Goodwill Impairment Test
The Corporation’s goodwill and other identifiable intangible assets having an indefinite useful life are tested for impairment. Intangibles with indefinite lives are evaluated for impairment at least annually and on a more frequent basis if events or circumstances indicate impairment could have taken place. Such events could include, among others, a significant adverse change in the business climate, an adverse action by a regulator, an unanticipated change in the competitive environment and a decision to change the operations or dispose of a reporting unit.
Under applicable accounting standards, goodwill impairment analysis is a two-step test. The first step of the goodwill impairment test involves comparing the fair value of the reporting unit with its carrying amount, including goodwill. If the fair value of the reporting unit exceeds its carrying amount, goodwill of the reporting unit is considered not impaired; however, if the carrying amount of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the second step must be performed. The second step involves calculating an implied fair value of goodwill for each reporting unit for which the first step indicated possible impairment. The implied fair value of goodwill is determined in the same manner as the amount of goodwill recognized in a business combination, which is the excess of the fair value of the reporting unit, as determined in the first step, over the aggregate fair values of the individual assets, liabilities and identifiable intangibles (including any unrecognized intangible assets, such as unrecognized core deposits and trademark) as if the reporting unit was being acquired in a business combination and the fair value of the reporting unit was the price paid to acquire the reporting unit. The Corporation estimates the fair values of the assets and liabilities of a reporting unit, consistent with the requirements of the fair value measurements accounting standard, which defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The fair value of the assets and liabilities reflects market conditions, thus volatility in prices could have a material impact on the determination of the implied fair value of the reporting unit goodwill at the impairment test date. The adjustments to measure the assets, liabilities and intangibles at fair value are for the purpose of measuring the implied fair value of goodwill and such adjustments are not reflected in the consolidated statement of condition. If the implied fair value of goodwill exceeds the goodwill assigned to the reporting unit, there is no impairment. If the goodwill assigned to a reporting unit exceeds the implied fair value of the goodwill, an impairment charge is recorded for the excess. An impairment loss recognized cannot exceed the amount of goodwill assigned to a reporting unit, and the loss establishes a new basis in the goodwill. Subsequent reversal of goodwill impairment losses is not permitted under applicable accounting standards.
The Corporation performed the annual goodwill impairment evaluation for the entire organization during the third quarter of 2010 using July 31, 2010 as the annual evaluation date. The reporting units utilized for this evaluation were those that are one level below the business segments, which are the legal entities within the reportable segment. The Corporation follows push-down accounting, as such all goodwill is assigned to the reporting units when carrying out a business combination.
In determining the fair value of a reporting unit, the Corporation generally uses a combination of methods, including market price multiples of comparable companies and transactions, as well as discounted cash flow analysis. Management evaluates the particular circumstances of each reporting unit in order to determine the most appropriate valuation methodology. The Corporation evaluates the results obtained under each valuation methodology to identify and understand the key value drivers in order to ascertain that the results obtained are reasonable and appropriate under the circumstances. Elements considered include current market and economic conditions, developments in specific lines of business, and any particular features in the individual reporting units.
The computations require management to make estimates and assumptions. Critical assumptions that are used as part

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of these evaluations include:
    a selection of comparable publicly traded companies, based on nature of business, location and size;
 
    a selection of comparable acquisition and capital raising transactions;
 
    the discount rate applied to future earnings, based on an estimate of the cost of equity;
 
    the potential future earnings of the reporting unit; and
 
    the market growth and new business assumptions.
For purposes of the market comparable approach, valuations were determined by calculating average price multiples of relevant value drivers from a group of companies that are comparable to the reporting unit being analyzed and applying those price multiples to the value drivers of the reporting unit. Multiples used are minority based multiples and thus, no control premium adjustment is made to the comparable companies market multiples. While the market price multiple is not an assumption, a presumption that it provides an indicator of the value of the reporting unit is inherent in the valuation. The determination of the market comparables also involves a degree of judgment.
For purposes of the discounted cash flows (“DCF”) approach, the valuation is based on estimated future cash flows. The financial projections used in the DCF valuation analysis for each reporting unit are based on the most recent (as of the valuation date) financial projections presented to the Corporation’s Asset / Liability Management Committee (“ALCO”). The growth assumptions included in these projections are based on management’s expectations for each reporting unit’s financial prospects considering economic and industry conditions as well as particular plans of each entity (i.e. restructuring plans, de-leveraging, etc.). The cost of equity used to discount the cash flows was calculated using the Ibbotson Build-Up Method and ranged from 8.42% to 23.24% for the 2010 analysis. The Ibbottson Build-Up Method builds up a cost of equity starting with the rate of return of a “risk-free” asset (10-year U.S. Treasury note) and adds to it additional risk elements such as equity risk premium, size premium, and industry risk premium. The resulting discount rates were analyzed in terms of reasonability given the current market conditions and adjustments were made when necessary.
For BPNA, the only reporting unit that failed Step 1, the Corporation determined the fair value of Step 1 utilizing a market value approach based on a combination of price multiples from comparable companies and multiples from capital raising transactions of comparable companies. The market multiples used included “price to book” and “price to tangible book”. Additionally, the Corporation determined the reporting unit fair value using a DCF analysis based on BPNA’s financial projections, but assigned no weight to it given that the current market approaches provide a more meaningful measure of fair value considering the reporting unit’s financial performance and current market conditions. The Step 1 fair value for BPNA under both valuation approaches (market and DCF) was below the carrying amount of its equity book value as of the valuation date (July 31), requiring the completion of Step 2. In accordance with accounting standards, the Corporation performed a valuation of all assets and liabilities of BPNA, including any recognized and unrecognized intangible assets, to determine the fair value of BPNA’s net assets. To complete Step 2, the Corporation subtracted from BPNA’s Step 1 fair value the determined fair value of the net assets to arrive at the implied fair value of goodwill. The results of the Step 2 indicated that the implied fair value of goodwill exceeded the goodwill carrying value of $402 million at July 31, 2010, resulting in no goodwill impairment. The reduction in BPNA’s Step 1 fair value was offset by a reduction in the fair value of its net assets, resulting in an implied fair value of goodwill that exceeds the recorded book value of goodwill.
The analysis of the results for Step 2 indicates that the reduction in the fair value of the reporting unit was mainly attributed to the deteriorated fair value of the loan portfolios and not to the fair value of the reporting unit as a going concern entity. The current negative performance of the reporting unit is principally related to deteriorated credit quality in its loan portfolio, which agrees with the results of the Step 2 analysis. The fair value determined for BPNA’s loan portfolio in the July 31, 2010 annual test represented a discount of 23.6%, compared with 20.2% at December 31, 2009. The discount is mainly attributed to market participant’s expected rate of returns, which affected the market discount on the commercial and construction loan portfolios and deteriorated credit quality of the consumer and mortgage loan portfolios of BPNA. Refer to Note 29 to the consolidated financial statements, which provides highlights of BPNA’s reportable segment financial performance for the quarter and nine-month periods ended September 30, 2010. BPNA’s provision for loan losses, as a stand-alone legal entity, which is the reporting unit level used for the goodwill impairment analysis, amounted to $226 million for nine months ended September 30, 2010, which represented 144% of BPNA legal entity’s net loss of $157 million for that period.

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If the Step 1 fair value of BPNA declines further in the future without a corresponding decrease in the fair value of its net assets or if loan discounts improve without a corresponding increase in the Step 1 fair value, the Corporation may be required to record a goodwill impairment charge. The Corporation engaged a third-party valuator to assist management in the annual evaluation of BPNA’s goodwill (including Step 1 and Step 2) as well as BPNA’s loan portfolios as of the July 31, 2010 valuation date. Management discussed the methodologies, assumptions and results supporting the relevant values for conclusions and determined they were reasonable.
Furthermore, as part of the analyses, management performed a reconciliation of the aggregate fair values determined for the reporting units to the market capitalization of Popular, Inc. concluding that the fair value results determined for the reporting units in the July 31, 2010 annual assessment were reasonable.
The goodwill impairment evaluation process requires the Corporation to make estimates and assumptions with regard to the fair value of the reporting units. Actual values may differ significantly from these estimates. Such differences could result in future impairment of goodwill that would, in turn, negatively impact the Corporation’s results of operations and the reporting units where the goodwill is recorded. Declines in the Corporation’s market capitalization increase the risk of goodwill impairment in the future.
Management monitors events or changes in circumstances between annual tests to determine if these events or changes in circumstances would more likely than not reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying amount. As indicated in this MD&A, the economic situation in the United States and Puerto Rico, including deterioration in the housing market and credit market, continued to negatively impact the financial results of the Corporation during 2010.
Note 15 — Deposits
Total interest bearing deposits as of September 30, 2010 and December 31, 2009, consisted of the following:
                 
    September 30,   December 31,
(In thousands)   2010   2009
 
Savings deposits
  $ 6,126,358     $ 5,480,124  
NOW, money market and other interest bearing demand deposits
    4,854,392       4,726,204  
 
Total savings, NOW, money market and other interest bearing demand deposits
    10,980,750       10,206,328  
 
 
               
Certificates of deposits:
               
Under $100,000
    6,609,544  [1]     6,553,022  [1]
$100,000 and over
    4,778,311       4,670,243  
 
Total certificates of deposits
    11,387,855       11,223,265  
 
Total interest bearing deposits
  $ 22,368,605     $ 21,429,593  
 
[1]   Includes brokered certificates of deposit amounting to $2.5 billion as of September 30, 2010 and $2.7 billion as of December 31, 2009.
 
A summary of certificates of deposit by maturity as of September 30, 2010 follows:
         
(In thousands)        
 
Remaining 2010
  $ 3,332,971  
2011
    4,775,554  
2012
    1,360,520  
2013
    655,948  
2014
    398,443  
2015 and thereafter
    864,419  
 
Total
  $ 11,387,855  
 

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Note 16 — Borrowings
Assets sold under agreements to repurchase were as follows:
                         
    September 30,   December 31,   September 30,
(In thousands)   2010   2009   2009
 
Assets sold under agreements to repurchase
  $ 2,358,139     $ 2,632,790     $ 2,807,891  
 
The repurchase agreements outstanding as of September 30, 2010 were collateralized by $2.1 billion in investment securities available-for-sale, $435 million in trading securities and $39 million in other assets. It is the Corporation’s policy to maintain effective control over assets sold under agreements to repurchase; accordingly, such securities continue to be carried on the consolidated statements of condition.
In addition, there were repurchase agreements outstanding collateralized by $170 million in securities purchased underlying agreements to resell to which the Corporation has the right to repledge. It is the Corporation’s policy to take possession of securities purchased under agreements to resell. However, the counterparties to such agreements maintain effective control over such securities, and accordingly are not reflected in the Corporation’s consolidated statements of condition.
Other short-term borrowings consisted of:
                         
    September 30,   December 31,   September 30,
(In thousands)   2010   2009   2009
 
Secured borrowing with clearing broker with an interest rate of 1.50%
        $ 6,000        
Advances with the FHLB maturing in October 2010 paying interest at maturity at fixed rates ranging from 0.41% to 0.43%
  $ 125,000              
Unsecured borrowings with private investors paying interest at a fixed rate of 0.45%
              $ 1,750  
Term funds purchased maturing in 2010 paying interest at maturity at fixed rates ranging from 0.65% to 1.15%
    65,079              
Others
    1,263       1,326       1,327  
 
Total other short-term borrowings
  $ 191,342     $ 7,326     $ 3,077  
 

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Notes payable consisted of:
                         
    September 30,   December 31,   September 30,
(In thousands)   2010   2009   2009
 
Advances with the FHLB:
                       
-with maturities ranging from 2011 through 2015 paying interest at monthly fixed rates ranging from 3.31% to 5.02% (September 30, 2009 — 1.48% to 5.06%)
  $ 568,423     $ 1,103,627     $ 1,105,429  
-maturing in 2010 paying interest quarterly at a fixed rate of 5.10%
          20,000       20,000  
 
                       
Note issued to the FDIC, including unamortized premium of $2,242; paying interest monthly at an annual fixed rate of 2.50%; maturing on April 30, 2015 or such earlier date as such amount may become due and payable pursuant to the terms of the note
    3,288,219              
 
                       
Term notes paying interest monthly at fixed rates ranging from 3.00% to 6.00%
                3,100  
 
                       
Term notes with maturities ranging from 2011 to 2013 paying interest semiannually at fixed rates ranging from 5.25% to 13.00% (September 30, 2009 — 5.20% to 9.75%)
    381,064       382,858       383,289  
 
                       
Term notes with maturities ranging from 2010 to 2013 paying interest monthly at a floating rate of 3.00% over the 10-year U.S. Treasury note rate
    1,112       1,528       2,111  
 
                       
Term notes paying interest quarterly at a floating rate of 6.00% to 7.50% over the
3-month LIBOR rate
          250,000       250,000  
 
                       
Junior subordinated deferrable interest debentures (related to trust preferred securities) with maturities ranging from 2027 to 2034 with fixed interest rates ranging from 6.125% to 8.327% (Refer to Note 17)
    439,800       439,800       439,800  
 
                       
Junior subordinated deferrable interest debentures (related to trust preferred securities) ($936,000 less discount of $496,678 as of September 30, 2010) with no stated maturity and a fixed interest rate of 5.00% until, but excluding December 5, 2013 and 9.00% thereafter (Refer to Note 17)
    439,322       423,650       418,833  
 
                       
Others
    25,448       27,169       27,259  
 
Total notes payable
  $ 5,143,388     $ 2,648,632     $ 2,649,821  
 
Note: Refer to the Corporation’s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009, for rates and maturity information corresponding to the borrowings outstanding as of such date. Key index rates as of September 30, 2010 and September 30, 2009, respectively, were as follows: 3-month LIBOR rate = 0.29% and 0.29%; 10-year U.S. Treasury note = 2.51% and 3.31%.
 
In consideration for the excess assets acquired over liabilities assumed as part of the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction, BPPR issued to the FDIC a secured note (the “note issued to the FDIC”) in the amount of $5.8 billion as of April 30, 2010 bearing an annual interest rate of 2.50%, which has full recourse to BPPR. As indicated in Notes 2 and 8 to the consolidated financial statements, the note issued to the FDIC is collateralized by the loans (other than certain consumer loans) and other real estate acquired in the agreement with the FDIC and all proceeds derived from such assets, including cash inflows from claims to the FDIC under the loss sharing agreements. Proceeds received from such sources are used to pay the note under the conditions stipulated in the agreement. The entire outstanding principal balance of the note issued to the FDIC is due five years from issuance (April 30, 2015), or such date as such amount may become due and payable pursuant to the terms of the note. Borrowings under the note bear interest at a fixed annual rate of 2.50% and is paid monthly. If the Corporation fails to pay any interest as and when due, such interest shall accrue interest at the note interest rate plus 2.00% per annum. The Corporation may repay the note in whole or in part without any penalty subject to certain notification requirements indicated in the agreement. During the third quarter of 2010, the Corporation prepaid $2.1 billion of the note issued to the FDIC from funds unrelated to the assets securing the note.

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A breakdown of borrowings by contractual maturities as of September 30, 2010 is included in the table below. Given its nature, the maturity of the note issued to the FDIC was based on expected repayment dates and not on its April 30, 2015 contractual maturity date. The expected repayments consider the timing of expected cash inflows on the loans, OREO and claims on the loss sharing agreements that will be applied to repay the note during the period that the note payable to the FDIC is outstanding.
                                 
    Federal funds sold            
    and repurchase   Short-term        
(In thousands)   agreements   borrowings   Notes payable   Total
 
Year
                               
2010
  $ 1,195,949     $ 191,342     $ 633,071     $ 2,020,362  
2011
    50,000             2,835,637       2,885,637  
2012
    75,000             631,835       706,835  
2013
    49,000             126,322       175,322  
2014
    350,000             10,824       360,824  
Later years
    638,190             466,377       1,104,567  
No stated maturity
                936,000       936,000  
 
Subtotal
  $ 2,358,139     $ 191,342     $ 5,640,066     $ 8,189,547  
Less: Discount
                (496,678 )     (496,678 )
 
Total borrowings
  $ 2,358,139     $ 191,342     $ 5,143,388     $ 7,692,869  
 
Note 17 — Trust Preferred Securities
As of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009, the Corporation had established four trusts (BanPonce Trust I, Popular Capital Trust I, Popular North America Capital Trust I and Popular Capital Trust II) for the purpose of issuing trust preferred securities (also referred to as “capital securities”) to the public. The proceeds from such issuances, together with the proceeds of the related issuances of common securities of the trusts (the “common securities”), were used by the trusts to purchase junior subordinated deferrable interest debentures (the “junior subordinated debentures”) issued by the Corporation. In August 2009, the Corporation established the Popular Capital Trust III for the purpose of exchanging the shares of Series C preferred stock held by the U.S. Treasury at the time for trust preferred securities issued by this trust. In connection with this exchange, the trust used the Series C preferred stock, together with the proceeds of issuance and sale of common securities of the trust, to purchase junior subordinated debentures issued by the Corporation.
The sole assets of the five trusts consisted of the junior subordinated debentures of the Corporation and the related accrued interest receivable. These trusts are not consolidated by the Corporation.
The junior subordinated debentures are included by the Corporation as notes payable in the consolidated statements of condition, while the common securities issued by the issuer trusts are included as other investment securities. The common securities of each trust are wholly-owned, or indirectly wholly-owned, by the Corporation.

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Financial data pertaining to the trusts as of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009 were as follows:
(In thousands)
 
                                         
                    Popular North        
    BanPonce   Popular Capital   America Capital   Popular Capital   Popular Capital
Issuer   Trust I   Trust I   Trust I   Trust II   Trust III
 
Capital securities
  $ 52,865     $ 181,063     $ 91,651     $ 101,023     $ 935,000  
Distribution rate
    8.327 %     6.700 %     6.564 %     6.125 %   5.000% until,
 
                                  but excluding
 
                                  December 5, 2013
 
                                  and 9.000%
 
                                  thereafter
Common securities
  $ 1,637     $ 5,601     $ 2,835     $ 3,125     $ 1,000  
Junior subordinated debentures aggregate liquidation amount
  $ 54,502     $ 186,664     $ 94,486     $ 104,148     $ 936,000  
Stated maturity date
  February 2027   November 2033   September 2034   December 2034   Perpetual
Reference notes
    (a),(c),(f), (g)     (b),(d), (e)     (a),(c), (f)     (b),(d), (f)     (b),(d),(h), (i)
 
 
[a]   Statutory business trust that is wholly-owned by Popular North America (“PNA”) and indirectly wholly-owned by the Corporation.
 
[b]   Statutory business trust that is wholly-owned by the Corporation.
 
[c]   The obligations of PNA under the junior subordinated debentures and its guarantees of the capital securities under the trust are fully and unconditionally guaranteed on a subordinated basis by the Corporation to the extent set forth in the applicable guarantee agreement.
 
[d]   These capital securities are fully and unconditionally guaranteed on a subordinated basis by the Corporation to the extent set forth in the applicable guarantee agreement.
 
[e]   The original issuance was for $150 million. The Corporation had reacquired $6 million of the 8.327% capital securities at December 31, 2008.
 
[f]   The Corporation has the right, subject to any required prior approval from the Federal Reserve, to redeem after certain dates or upon the occurrence of certain events mentioned below, the junior subordinated debentures at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount, plus accrued and unpaid interest to the date of redemption. The maturity of the junior subordinated debentures may be shortened at the option of the Corporation prior to their stated maturity dates (i) on or after the stated optional redemption dates stipulated in the agreements, in whole at any time or in part from time to time, or (ii) in whole, but not in part, at any time within 90 days following the occurrence and during the continuation of a tax event, an investment company event or a capital treatment event as set forth in the indentures relating to the capital securities, in each case subject to regulatory approval.
 
[g]   Same as [f] above, except that the investment company event does not apply for early redemption.
 
[h]   The debentures are perpetual and may be redeemed by Popular at any time, subject to the consent of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.
 
[i]   Carrying value of junior subordinates debentures of $439 million as of September 30, 2010 ($936 million aggregate liquidation amount, net of $497 million discount); $424 million as of December 31, 2009 ($936 million aggregate liquidation amount, net of $512 million discount), and $419 million as of September 30, 2009 ($936 million aggregate liquidation amount, net of $517 million discount).
 
In accordance with the Federal Reserve Board guidance, the trust preferred securities represent restricted core capital elements and qualify as Tier 1 Capital, subject to quantitative limits. The aggregate amount of restricted core capital elements that may be included in the Tier 1 Capital of a banking organization must not exceed 25% of the sum of all core capital elements (including cumulative perpetual preferred stock and trust preferred securities). As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation’s restricted core capital elements did not exceed the 25% limitation. Thus, all trust preferred securities were allowed as Tier 1 capital. As of December 31, 2009, there were $7 million of the outstanding trust preferred securities which were disallowed as Tier 1 capital. Amounts of restricted core capital elements in excess of this limit generally may be included in Tier 2 capital, subject to further limitations. The Federal Reserve Board revised the quantitative limit which would limit restricted core capital elements included in the Tier 1 capital of a bank holding company to 25% of the sum of core capital elements (including restricted core capital elements), net of goodwill less any associated deferred tax liability. The new limit would be effective on March 31, 2011. Furthermore, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, recently passed in July 2010, has a provision to effectively phase out the use of trust preferred securities as Tier 1 capital throughout a

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five-year period. As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation had $427 million in trust preferred securities (capital securities) that are subject to the phase-out. As of September 30, 2010, the remaining trust preferred securities corresponded to capital securities issued to the U.S. Treasury pursuant to the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, and were issued prior to October 4, 2010 and thus, are exempt from the Dodd-Frank banking bill provision.
Note 18 — Stockholders’ Equity
Increase in authorized shares of common stock
On May 4, 2010, following stockholder approval, the Corporation amended its certificate of incorporation to provide for an increase in the number of shares of the Corporation’s common stock authorized for issuance from 700 million shares to 1.7 billion shares.
Issuance of depositary shares representing preferred stock and conversion to shares of common stock
In April 2010, the Corporation raised $1.15 billion through the sale of 46,000,000 depositary shares, each representing a 1/40th interest in a share of Contingent Convertible Perpetual Non-Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series D, no par value, $1,000 liquidation preference per share. The preferred stock represented by depositary shares automatically converted into shares of Popular, Inc.’s common stock at a conversion rate of 8.3333 shares of common stock for each depositary share on May 11, 2010, which was the 5th business day after the Corporation’s common shareholders approved the amendment to the Corporation’s restated certificate of incorporation to increase the number of authorized shares of common stock. The conversion of the depositary shares of preferred stock resulted in the issuance of 383,333,333 additional shares of common stock. The net proceeds from the public offering amounted to approximately $1.1 billion, after deducting the underwriting discount and estimated offering expenses. Note 23 to the consolidated financial statements provides information on the impact of the conversion on net income per common share.
BPPR statutory reserve
The Banking Act of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico requires that a minimum of 10% of BPPR’s net income for the year be transferred to a statutory reserve account until such statutory reserve equals the total of paid-in capital on common and preferred stock. Any losses incurred by a bank must first be charged to retained earnings and then to the reserve fund. Amounts credited to the reserve fund may not be used to pay dividends without the prior consent of the Puerto Rico Commissioner of Financial Institutions. The failure to maintain sufficient statutory reserves would preclude BPPR from paying dividends. BPPR’s statutory reserve fund totaled $402 million as of September 30, 2010 (December 31, 2009 — $402 million; September 30, 2009 — $392 million). There were no transfers between the statutory reserve account and the retained earnings account during the quarters and nine months ended September 30, 2010 and 2009.
Note 19 — Commitments, Contingencies and Guarantees
Commercial letters of credit and standby letters of credit amounted to $19 million and $116 million, respectively, as of September 30, 2010 (December 31, 2009 — $13 million and $134 million, respectively; and September 30, 2009 — $18 million and $162 million, respectively). In addition, the Corporation has commitments to originate mortgage loans amounting to $64 million as of September 30, 2010 (December 31, 2009 — $48 million; September 30, 2009 — $55 million).
As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation recorded a liability of $0.5 million (December 31, 2009 - $0.7 million and September 30, 2009 — $0.6 million), which represents the unamortized balance of the obligations undertaken in issuing the guarantees under the standby letters of credit. The Corporation recognizes at fair value the obligation at inception of the standby letters of credit. The fair value approximates the fee received from the customer for issuing such commitments. These fees are deferred and recognized over the commitment period. This liability is included as part of other liabilities in the consolidated statements of condition. The contract amounts in standby letters of credit outstanding represent the maximum potential amount of future payments the Corporation could be required to make under the guarantees in the event of nonperformance by the customers. These standby letters of credit are used by the customer as a credit enhancement and typically expire without being drawn upon. In the event of nonperformance by the customers, the Corporation has rights to the underlying collateral provided, if any, which

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normally includes cash and marketable securities, real estate, receivables, among others. Management does not anticipate any material losses related to these instruments.
Commitments to extend credit, which include credit card lines, commercial lines of credit, and other unused credit commitments, amounted to $6.2 billion as of September 30, 2010 (December 31, 2009 — $7.0 billion; September 30, 2009 — $7.0 billion), excluding the commitments to extend credit that pertain to the lending relationships of the Westernbank operations.
As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation maintained a reserve of approximately $8 million for potential losses associated with unfunded loan commitments related to commercial and consumer lines of credit unrelated to the acquired lending relationships from the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction (December 31, 2009 — $15 million; September 30, 2009 — $18 million). The estimated reserve is principally based on the expected draws on these facilities using historical trends and the application of the corresponding reserve factors determined under the Corporation’s allowance for loan losses methodology. This reserve for unfunded exposures remains separate and distinct from the allowance for loan losses and is reported as part of other liabilities in the consolidated statement of condition.
As of September 30, 2010, the commitments to extend credit related to the Westernbank acquired lending relationships approximated $176 million. The acquired commitments to extend credit are covered under the loss sharing agreements with the FDIC, subject to FDIC approvals, limitations on the timing for such disbursements, and servicing guidelines, among various considerations. As indicated in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, on the April 30, 2010 acquisition date, the Corporation recorded a contingent liability for such commitments at fair value. As of September 30, 2010, that contingent liability amounted to $120 million and is recorded as part of other liabilities in the consolidated statement of condition.
The Corporation securitized mortgage loans into guaranteed mortgage-backed securities subject to limited, and in certain instances, lifetime credit recourse on the loans that serve as collateral for the mortgage-backed securities. Also, from time to time, the Corporation may have sold, in bulk sale transactions, residential mortgage loans subject to credit recourse or to certain representations and warranties from the Corporation to the purchaser. These representations and warranties may relate, for example, to borrower creditworthiness, loan documentation, collateral, prepayment and early payment defaults. The Corporation may be required to repurchase the loans under the credit recourse agreements or for breach of representations and warranties.
As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation serviced $4.1 billion (December 31, 2009 — $4.5 billion; September 30, 2009 — $4.5 billion) in residential mortgage loans subject to credit recourse provisions, principally loans associated with FNMA and Freddie Mac programs. In the event of any customer default, pursuant to the credit recourse provided, the Corporation may be required to repurchase the loan or reimburse for the incurred loss. The maximum potential amount of future payments that the Corporation would be required to make under the recourse arrangements in the event of nonperformance by the borrowers is equivalent to the total outstanding balance of the residential mortgage loans serviced with recourse and interest, if applicable. During the nine months ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation repurchased approximately $93 million in mortgage loans subject to the credit recourse provisions. In the event of nonperformance by the borrower, the Corporation has rights to the underlying collateral securing the mortgage loan. The Corporation suffers losses on these loans when the proceeds from a foreclosure sale of the property underlying a defaulted mortgage loan are less than the outstanding principal balance of the loan plus any uncollected interest advanced and the costs of holding and disposing of the related property. Most claims associated with the residential mortgage loans subject to credit recourse provisions are settled by repurchases of delinquent loans. As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation’s liability established to cover the estimated credit loss exposure related to loans sold or serviced with credit recourse amounted to $38 million (December 31, 2009 — $16 million; September 30, 2009 — $16 million).
The probable losses to be absorbed under the credit recourse arrangements are recorded as a liability when the loans are sold and are updated by accruing or reversing expense (categorized in the line item“gain (loss) on sale of loans, including adjustments to indemnity reserves, and valuation adjustments on loans held-for-sale” in the consolidated statements of operations) throughout the life of the loan, as necessary, when additional relevant information becomes available. The methodology used to estimate the recourse liability is a function of the recourse arrangements given and considers a variety of factors, which include actual defaults and historical loss experience, foreclosure rate,

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estimated future defaults and the probability that a loan would be delinquent. Statistical methods are used to estimate the recourse liability. Expected loss rates are applied to different loan segmentations.The expected loss, which represents the amount expected to be lost on a given loan over a twelve-month period, considers the probability of default and loss severity. The probability of default represents the probability that a loan in good standing would become 90 days delinquent within the following twelve-month period. Regression analysis quantifies the relationship between the default event and loan-specific characteristics, including credit scores, loan-to-value rates, loan aging, among others.
When the Corporation sells or securitizes mortgage loans, it generally makes customary representations and warranties regarding the characteristics of the loans sold. The Corporation’s mortgage operations in Puerto Rico group conforming mortgage loans into pools which are exchanged for FNMA and GNMA mortgage-backed securities, which are generally sold to private investors, or may sell the loans directly to FNMA or other private investors for cash. To the extent the loans do not meet specified characteristics, the Corporation may be required to repurchase such loans or indemnify for losses. As required under the government agency programs, quality review procedures are performed by the Corporation to ensure that asset guideline qualifications are met. The Corporation has not recorded any specific contingent liability in the consolidated financial statements for these customary representation and warranties related to loans sold by the Corporation’s mortgage operations in Puerto Rico, and management believes that, based on historical data, the probability of payments and expected losses under these representations and warranty arrangements is not significant.
Servicing agreements relating to the mortgage-backed securities programs of FNMA and GNMA, and to mortgage loans sold or serviced to certain other investors, including FHLMC, require the Corporation to advance funds to make scheduled payments of principal, interest, taxes and insurance, if such payments have not been received from the borrowers. As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation serviced $18.0 billion in mortgage loans, including the loans serviced with credit recourse (December 31, 2009 — $17.7 billion; September 30, 2009 — $17.7 billion). The Corporation generally recovers funds advanced pursuant to these arrangements from the mortgage owner, from liquidation proceeds from mortgage loans foreclosed or, in the case of FHA/VA loans, under the applicable FHA and VA insurance and guarantee programs. However, in the meantime, the Corporation must absorb the cost of the funds it advances during the time the advance is outstanding. The Corporation must also bear the costs of attempting to collect on delinquent and defaulted mortgage loans. In addition, if a defaulted loan is not cured, the mortgage loan would be canceled as part of the foreclosure proceedings and the Corporation would not receive any future servicing income with respect to that loan. As of September 30, 2010, the outstanding balance of funds advanced by the Corporation under such mortgage loan servicing agreements was approximately $25 million (December 31, 2009 — $14 million; September 30, 2009 — $14 million). To the extent the mortgage loans underlying the Corporation’s servicing portfolio experience increased delinquencies, the Corporation would be required to dedicate additional cash resources to comply with its obligation to advance funds as well as incur additional administrative costs related to increases in collection efforts.
As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation established reserves for customary representations and warranties related to loans sold by its U.S. subsidiary E-LOAN. Loans had been sold to investors on a servicing released basis subject to certain representations and warranties. Although the risk of loss or default was generally assumed by the investors, the Corporation is required to make certain representations relating to borrower creditworthiness, loan documentation and collateral, which if not complied, may result in requiring the Corporation to repurchase the loans or indemnify investors for any related losses associated to these loans. The loans had been sold prior to 2009. As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation’s reserve for estimated losses from such representation and warranty arrangements amounted to $35 million, which was included as part of other liabilities in the consolidated statement of condition (December 31, 2009 — $33 million; September 30, 2009 — $21 million). E-LOAN is no longer originating and selling loans, since the subsidiary ceased these activities during 2008. On a quarterly basis, the Corporation reassesses its estimate for expected losses associated to E-LOAN’s customary representation and warranty arrangements. The analysis incorporates expectations on future disbursements based on quarterly repurchases and make-whole events. The analysis also considers factors such as the average length-time between the loan’s funding date and the loan repurchase date as observed in the historical loan data. During the nine months ended September 30, 2010, E-LOAN charged-off approximately $8.8 million against this representation and warranty reserve associated with loan repurchases and indemnification or make-whole events (nine months ended September 30, 2009 — $13.2 million). Make-whole events are typically defaulted loans in which the investor attempts to recover through the collateral or guarantees, and the seller is obligated to cover any impaired or unrecovered

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portion of the loan. Claims have been predominantly for first mortgage agency loans and principally consist of underwriting errors related to undisclosed debt or missing documentation.
During 2008, the Corporation provided indemnifications for the breach of certain representations or warranties in connection with various sales of assets by the discontinued operations of PFH. These sales were on a non-credit recourse basis. The agreements primarily include indemnification for breaches of certain key representations and warranties, some of which expire within a definite time period; others survive until the expiration of the applicable statute of limitations, and others do not expire. Certain of the indemnifications are subject to a cap or maximum aggregate liability defined as a percentage of the purchase price. The indemnifications agreements outstanding as of September 30, 2010 are related principally to make-whole arrangements. As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation’s reserve related to PFH’s indemnity arrangements amounted to $4 million (December 31, 2009 — $9 million; September 30, 2009 — $19 million). During the nine months ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation recorded charge-offs with respect to the PFH’s representation and warranty arrangements amounting to approximately $2.3 million (nine months ended September 30, 2009 - $1.2 million). The reserve balance as of September 30, 2010 contemplates historical indemnity payments. Certain indemnification provisions, which included, for example, reimbursement of premiums on early loan payoffs and repurchase obligations for defaulted loans within a short-term period, expired during 2009. Popular, Inc. Holding Company and Popular North America have agreed to guarantee certain obligations of PFH with respect to the indemnification obligations.
Popular, Inc. Holding Company (“PIHC”) fully and unconditionally guarantees certain borrowing obligations issued by certain of its wholly-owned consolidated subsidiaries totaling $0.6 billion as of September 30, 2010 (December 31, 2009 — $0.6 billion; September 30, 2009 — $0.7 billion). In addition, as of September 30, 2010, PIHC fully and unconditionally guaranteed on a subordinated basis $1.4 billion of capital securities (trust preferred securities) (December 31, 2009 — $1.4 billion; September 30, 2009 — $1.4 billion) issued by wholly-owned issuing trust entities to the extent set forth in the applicable guarantee agreement. Refer to Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements for further information on the trust preferred securities.
As described in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, as part of the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction, BPPR has agreed to make a true-up payment to the FDIC on the true up measurement date of the final shared loss month, or upon the final disposition of all covered assets under the loss sharing agreements in the event losses on the loss sharing agreements fail to reach expected levels. The estimated fair value of such true up payment is recorded as a reduction in the fair value of the FDIC loss share indemnification asset.
Legal Proceedings
The Corporation and its subsidiaries are defendants in a number of legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business. Based on the opinion of legal counsel, management believes that the final disposition of these matters, except for the matters described below which are each in early stages and management cannot currently predict their outcome, will not have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity.
Between May 14, 2009 and September 9, 2009, five putative class actions and two derivative claims were filed in the United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico and the Puerto Rico Court of First Instance, San Juan Part, against Popular, Inc., certain of its directors and officers, among others. The five class actions have now been consolidated into two separate actions: a securities class action captioned Hoff v. Popular, Inc., et al. (consolidated with Otero v. Popular, Inc., et al.) and an Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) class action entitled In re Popular, Inc. ERISA Litigation (comprised of the consolidated cases of Walsh v. Popular, Inc. et al.; Montañez v. Popular, Inc., et al.; and Dougan v. Popular, Inc., et al.).
On October 19, 2009, plaintiffs in the Hoff case filed a consolidated class action complaint which included as defendants the underwriters in the May 2008 offering of Series B Preferred Stock, among others. The consolidated action purports to be on behalf of purchasers of Popular’s securities between January 24, 2008 and February 19, 2009 and alleges that the defendants violated Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act, and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder, and Section 20(a) of the Exchange Act by issuing a series of allegedly false and/or misleading statements and/or omitting to disclose material facts necessary to make statements made by the Corporation not false and misleading. The consolidated action also alleges that the defendants violated Section 11, Section 12(a)(2) and Section 15 of the Securities Act by making allegedly untrue statements and/or omitting to disclose material facts

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necessary to make statements made by the Corporation not false and misleading in connection with the May 2008 offering of Series B Preferred Stock. The consolidated securities class action complaint seeks class certification, an award of compensatory damages and reasonable costs and expenses, including counsel fees. On January 11, 2010, Popular, the underwriter defendants and the individual defendants moved to dismiss the consolidated securities class action complaint. On August 2, 2010, the U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico granted the motion to dismiss filed by the underwriter defendants on statute of limitations grounds. The Court also dismissed the Section 11 claim brought against Popular’s directors on statute of limitations grounds and the Section 12(a)(2) claim brought against Popular because plaintiffs lacked standing. The Court declined to dismiss the claims brought against Popular and certain of its officers under Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act (and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder), Section 20(a) of the Exchange Act, and Sections 11 and 15 of the Securities Act, holding that plaintiffs had adequately alleged that defendants made materially false and misleading statements with the requisite state of mind.
On November 30, 2009, plaintiffs in the ERISA case filed a consolidated class action complaint. The consolidated complaint purports to be on behalf of employees participating in the Popular, Inc. U.S.A. 401(k) Savings and Investment Plan and the Popular, Inc. Puerto Rico Savings and Investment Plan from January 24, 2008 to the date of the Complaint to recover losses pursuant to Sections 409 and 502(a)(2) of ERISA against Popular, certain directors, officers and members of plan committees, each of whom is alleged to be a plan fiduciary. The consolidated complaint alleges that the defendants breached their alleged fiduciary obligations by, among other things, failing to eliminate Popular stock as an investment alternative in the plans. The complaint seeks to recover alleged losses to the plans and equitable relief, including injunctive relief and a constructive trust, along with costs and attorneys’ fees. On December 21, 2009, and in compliance with a scheduling order issued by the Court, Popular and the individual defendants submitted an answer to the amended complaint. Shortly thereafter, on December 31, 2009, Popular and the individual defendants filed a motion to dismiss the consolidated class action complaint or, in the alternative, for judgment on the pleadings. On May 5, 2010, a magistrate judge issued a report and recommendation in which he recommended that the motion to dismiss be denied except with respect to Banco Popular de Puerto Rico, as to which he recommended that the motion be granted. On May 19, 2010, Popular filed objections to the magistrate judge’s report and recommendation. On June 21, 2010, plaintiffs filed a response to these objections. On July 9, 2010, with leave of the Court, Popular filed a reply to plaintiffs’ response. On September 30, 2010, the Court issued an order without opinion granting in part and denying in part the motion to dismiss and providing that the Court would issue an opinion and order explaining its decision. To date, no opinion has been issued. Discovery is ongoing in the ERISA case, and the parties have agreed to coordinate discovery with respect to common issues with discovery in the García and Hoff cases.
The derivative actions (García v. Carrión, et al. and Díaz v. Carrión, et al.) have been brought purportedly for the benefit of nominal defendant Popular, Inc. against certain executive officers and directors and allege breaches of fiduciary duty, waste of assets and abuse of control in connection with our issuance of allegedly false and misleading financial statements and financial reports and the offering of the Series B Preferred Stock. The derivative complaints seek a judgment that the action is a proper derivative action, an award of damages and restitution, and costs and disbursements, including reasonable attorneys’ fees, costs and expenses. On October 9, 2009, the Court coordinated for purposes of discovery the García action and the consolidated securities class action. On October 15, 2009, Popular and the individual defendants moved to dismiss the García complaint for failure to make a demand on the Board of Directors prior to initiating litigation. On November 20, 2009, plaintiffs filed an amended complaint, and on December 21, 2009, Popular and the individual defendants moved to dismiss the García amended complaint. At a scheduling conference held on January 14, 2010, the Court stayed discovery in both the Hoff and García matters pending resolution of their respective motions to dismiss. On August 11, 2010, the Court granted in part and denied in part the motion to dismiss the Garcia action. The Court dismissed the gross mismanagement and corporate waste claims, but declined to dismiss the breach of fiduciary duty claim. Discovery has now commenced in the Hoff and Garcia actions and is to proceed in coordinated fashion. At the Court’s request, the parties to the Hoff and Garcia cases discussed the prospect of mediation and have agreed to nonbinding mediation in an attempt to determine whether the cases can be settled.
The Díaz case, filed in the Puerto Rico Court of First Instance, San Juan, was removed to the U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico. On October 13, 2009, Popular and the individual defendants moved to consolidate the García and Díaz actions. On October 26, 2009, plaintiff moved to remand the Díaz case to the Puerto Rico Court of First Instance and to stay defendants’ consolidation motion pending the outcome of the remand proceedings. On

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September 30, 2010, the Court issued an order without opinion remanding the Diaz case to the Puerto Rico Court of First Instance. On October 13, 2010, the Court issued a Statement of Reasons In Support of Remand Order. On October 28, 2010, Popular and the individual defendants moved for reconsideration of the remand order. The reconsideration motion is pending.
On April 13, 2010, the Puerto Rico Court of First Instance in San Juan granted summary judgment dismissing a separate complaint brought by plaintiff in the García action that sought to enforce an alleged right to inspect the books and records of the Corporation in support of the pending derivative action. The Court held that the plaintiff had not propounded a “proper purpose” under Puerto Rico law for such inspection. On April 28, 2010, the plaintiff in that action moved for reconsideration of the Court’s dismissal. On May 4, 2010, the Court denied plaintiff’s request for reconsideration. On June 7, 2010, plaintiff filed an appeal before the Puerto Rico Court of Appeals. On June 11, 2010, Popular and the individual defendants moved to dismiss the appeal. On June 22, 2010, the Court of Appeals dismissed the appeal. On July 6, 2010, plaintiff moved for reconsideration of the Court’s dismissal. On July 16, 2010, the Court of Appeals denied plaintiff’s request for reconsideration.
On October 7, 2010, a new putative class action suit for breach of contract and damages, captioned Almeyda-Santiago v. Banco Popular de Puerto Rico, was filed in the Puerto Rico Court of First Instance against Banco Popular de Puerto Rico. The complaint essentially asserts that plaintiff has suffered damages because of Banco Popular’s alleged fraudulent overdraft fee practices in connection with debit card transactions. Such practices allegedly consist of: (a) the reorganization of electronic debit transactions in high-to-low order so as to multiply the number of overdraft fees assessed on its customers; (b) the assessment of overdraft fees even when clients have not overdrawn their accounts; (c) the failure to disclose, or to adequately disclose, its overdraft policy to its customers; and (d) the provision of false and fraudulent information regarding its clients’ account balances at point of sale transactions and on its website. Plaintiff seeks damages, restitution and provisional remedies against Banco Popular for breach of contract, abuse of trust, illegal conversion and unjust enrichment. The Corporation intends to contend vigorously these claims.
At this early stage, it is not possible for management to assess the probability of an adverse outcome, or reasonably estimate the amount of any potential loss. It is possible that the ultimate resolution of these matters, if unfavorable, may be material to the Corporation’s results of operations.
Note 20 —Non-Consolidated Variable Interest Entities
The Corporation transfers residential mortgage loans in guaranteed loan securitizations. The Corporation’s continuing involvement in these transfers includes owning certain beneficial interests in the form of securities as well as the servicing rights retained. The Corporation is not required to provide additional financial support to any of the variable interest entities to which it has transferred the financial assets. The mortgage-backed securities, to the extent retained, are classified in the Corporation’s consolidated statement of condition as available-for-sale or trading securities.
The Corporation is involved with various special purpose entities mainly in guaranteed mortgage securitization transactions. These special purpose entities are deemed to be variable interest entities (“VIEs”) since they lack equity investments at risk. As part of the adoption of ASU 2009-17, during the first quarter of 2010, the Corporation evaluated these guaranteed mortgage securitization structures in which it participates, including GNMA and FNMA, and concluded that the Corporation is not the primary beneficiary of these VIEs, and therefore, are not required to be consolidated in the Corporation’s financial statements. The Corporation qualitatively assessed whether it held a controlling financial interest in these VIEs, which included analyzing if it had both the power to direct the activities of the VIE that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance and the obligation to absorb losses of the entity that could potentially be significant to the VIE. The Corporation concluded that, essentially, these entities (FNMA and GNMA) control the design of the VIE, dictate the quality and nature of the collateral, require the underlying insurance, set the servicing standards via the servicing guides and can change them at will, and remove a primary servicer with cause, and without cause in the case of FNMA. Moreover, through their guarantee obligations, agencies (FNMA and GNMA) have the obligation to absorb losses that could be potentially significant to the VIE. The conclusion on the assessment of these guaranteed mortgage securitization transactions did not change during the third quarter of 2010.
The Corporation holds variable interests in these VIEs in the form of agency mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations, including those securities originated by the Corporation and those acquired from third parties. Additionally, the Corporation holds agency mortgage-backed securities, agency collateralized mortgage obligations and private label collateralized mortgage obligations issued by third party VIEs in which it has no other form of continuing involvement. Refer to Note 21 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information on the debt securities outstanding as of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009, which are classified as available-for-sale and trading securities in the Corporation’s consolidated statement of condition. In addition, the Corporation may retain the right to service the transferred loans in those government-sponsored special purpose entities (“SPEs”) and may also purchase the right to service loans in other government-sponsored SPEs that were transferred to those SPEs by a third-party. Pursuant to ASC Subtopic 810-10, the servicing fees that the Corporation receives for its servicing role are considered variable interests in the VIEs because the servicing fees are

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subordinated to the principal and interest that first needs to be paid to the mortgage-backed securities’ investors and to the guaranty fees that need to be paid to the federal agencies.
The following table presents the carrying amount and classification of the assets related to the Corporation’s variable interests in non-consolidated VIEs and the maximum exposure to loss as a result of the Corporation’s involvement as servicer with non-consolidated VIEs as of September 30, 2010 and December 31, 2009.
                 
(In thousands)   September 30, 2010   December 31, 2009
 
Assets
               
Servicing assets:
               
Mortgage servicing rights
  $ 104,978     $ 104,984  
 
Total servicing assets
  $ 104,978     $ 104,984  
 
Other assets:
               
Servicing advances
  $ 3,339     $ 2,029  
 
Total other assets
  $ 3,339     $ 2,029  
 
Total
  $ 108,317     $ 107,013  
 
Maximum exposure to loss
  $ 108,317     $ 107,013  
 
The size of the non-consolidated VIEs, in which the Corporation has a variable interest in the form of servicing fees, measured as the total unpaid principal balance of the loans, amounted to $9.4 billion as of September 30, 2010 and $9.3 billion as of December 31, 2009.
Maximum exposure to loss represents the maximum loss, under a worst case scenario, that would be incurred by the Corporation, as servicer for the VIEs, assuming all loans serviced are delinquent and that the value of the Corporation’s interests and any associated collateral declines to zero, without any consideration of recovery. The Corporation determined that the maximum exposure to loss includes the fair value of the MSRs and the assumption that the servicing advances as of September 30, 2010 and December 31, 2009 will not be recovered. The agency debt securities are not included as part of the maximum exposure to loss since they are guaranteed by the related agencies.
Note 21 — Fair Value Measurement
ASC Subtopic 820-10 “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures” establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three levels in order to increase consistency and comparability in fair value measurements and disclosures. The hierarchy is broken down into three levels based on the reliability of inputs as follows:
    Level 1- Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the Corporation has the ability to access at the measurement date. Valuation on these instruments does not necessitate a significant degree of judgment since valuations are based on quoted prices that are readily available in an active market.
 
    Level 2- Quoted prices other than those included in Level 1 that are observable either directly or indirectly. Level 2 inputs include quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active, or other inputs that are observable or that can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the financial instrument.
 
    Level 3- Inputs are unobservable and significant to the fair value measurement. Unobservable inputs reflect the Corporation’s own assumptions about assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability.
The Corporation maximizes the use of observable inputs and minimizes the use of unobservable inputs by requiring that the observable inputs be used when available. Fair value is based upon quoted market prices when available. If listed prices or quotes are not available, the Corporation employs internally-developed models that primarily use market-based inputs including yield curves, interest rates, volatilities, and credit curves, among others. Valuation adjustments are limited to those necessary to ensure that the financial instrument’s fair value is adequately representative of the price that would be received or paid in the marketplace. These adjustments include amounts that reflect counterparty credit quality, the Corporation’s credit standing, constraints on liquidity and unobservable parameters that are applied consistently.
The estimated fair value may be subjective in nature and may involve uncertainties and matters of significant

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judgment for certain financial instruments. Changes in the underlying assumptions used in calculating the fair value could significantly affect the results.
Fair Value on a Recurring Basis
The following fair value hierarchy tables present information about the Corporation’s assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of September 30, 2010, December 31, 2009 and September 30, 2009:
                                 
    As of September 30, 2010
                            Balance as of
                            September 30,
(In millions)   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   2010
 
Assets
                               
Continuing Operations
                               
Investment securities available-for-sale:
                               
U.S. Treasury securities
        $ 40           $ 40  
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities
          1,397             1,397  
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
          53             53  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
          1,347             1,347  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
          95             95  
Residential mortgage-backed securities — agencies
          2,775     $ 8       2,783  
Equity securities
  $ 3       5               8  
Other
          18             18  
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
  $ 3     $ 5,730     $ 8     $ 5,741  
 
Trading account securities, excluding derivatives:
                               
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
        $ 17           $ 17  
Collateralized mortgage obligations
          1     $ 3       4  
Residential mortgage-backed securities — agencies
          426       24       450  
Other
          9       3       12  
 
Total trading account securities
        $ 453     $ 30     $ 483  
 
Mortgage servicing rights
              $ 166     $ 166  
Derivatives
        $ 86           $ 86  
 
Total
  $ 3     $ 6,269     $ 204     $ 6,476  
 
 
                               
Liabilities
                               
Continuing Operations
                               
Derivatives
          ($91 )           ($91 )
Equity appreciation instrument
          ($18 )           ($18 )
 
Total
          ($109 )           ($109 )
 

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    As of December 31, 2009
                            Balance as of
                            December 31,
(In millions)   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   2009
 
Assets
                               
Continuing Operations
                               
Investment securities available-for-sale:
                               
U.S. Treasury securities
        $ 30           $ 30  
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities
          1,648             1,648  
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
          81             81  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
          1,600             1,600  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — private label
          118             118  
Residential mortgage-backed securities — agencies
          3,176     $ 34       3,210  
Equity securities
  $ 3       5             8  
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
  $ 3     $ 6,658     $ 34     $ 6,695  
 
Trading account securities, excluding derivatives:
                               
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
        $ 13           $ 13  
Collateralized mortgage obligations
          1     $ 3       4  
Residential mortgage-backed securities — agencies
          208       224       432  
Other
          9       3       12  
 
Total trading account securities
        $ 231     $ 230     $ 461  
 
Mortgage servicing rights
              $ 170     $ 170  
Derivatives
        $ 73           $ 73  
 
Total
  $ 3     $ 6,962     $ 434     $ 7,399  
 
 
                               
Liabilities
                               
Continuing Operations
                               
Derivatives
          ($73 )           ($73 )
 
Total
          ($73 )           ($73 )
 

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    As of September 30, 2009
                            Balance as of
                            September 30,
(In millions)   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   2009
 
Assets
                               
Continuing Operations
                               
Investment securities available-for-sale:
                               
U.S. Treasury securities
        $ 31           $ 31  
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities
          1,694             1,694  
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
          89             89  
Corporate bonds
          1,598             1,598  
Collateralized mortgage obligations — federal agencies
          127             127  
Residential mortgage-backed securities — agencies
          3,411     $ 34       3,445  
Equity securities
  $ 4       5             9  
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
  $ 4     $ 6,955     $ 34     $ 6,993  
 
Trading account securities, excluding derivatives:
                               
Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions
        $ 3           $ 3  
Collateralized mortgage obligations
          1     $ 4       5  
Residential mortgage-backed securities — agencies
          180       233       413  
Other
          22       4       26  
 
Total trading account securities
        $ 206     $ 241     $ 447  
 
Mortgage servicing rights
              $ 180     $ 180  
Derivatives
        $ 81           $ 81  
 
Total
  $ 4     $ 7,242     $ 455     $ 7,701  
 
 
                               
Liabilities
                               
Continuing Operations
                               
Derivatives
          ($89 )           ($89 )
 
Total
          ($89 )           ($89 )
 

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The following tables present the changes in Level 3 assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis for the quarters and nine months ended September 30, 2010 and 2009:
                                                         
Quarter ended September 30, 2010
                                            Changes in    
                                            unrealized    
                                            gains (losses)    
                                            included in    
                    Purchases,                   earnings/OCI    
                    sales,                   related to    
                    issuances,                   assets and    
            Gains   settlements,   Transfers   Balance as   liabilities still    
    Balance   (losses)   and   in (out)   of   held as of    
    as of June   included in   paydowns   of Level   September   September    
(In millions)   30, 2010   earnings/OCI   (net)   3   30, 2010   30, 2010    
 
Assets
                                                       
 
Continuing Operations
                                                       
Investment securities available-for-sale:
                                                       
Residential mortgage- backed securities — agencies
  $ 32           $ 1       ($25 )   $ 8                
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
  $ 32           $ 1       ($25 )   $ 8                
 
Trading account securities:
                                                       
Collateralized mortgage obligations
  $ 3                       $ 3                
Residential mortgage- backed securities — agencies
    114     $ 1       ($3 )     ($88 )     24                
Other
    3                         3                
 
Total trading account securities
  $ 120     $ 1       ($3 )     ($88 )   $ 30             [a]  
 
Mortgage servicing rights
  $ 172       ($10 )   $ 4           $ 166       ($6 )     [b]  
 
Total
  $ 324       ($9 )   $ 2       ($113 )   $ 204       ($6 )        
 
 
[a]   Gains (losses) are included in “Trading account profit” in the statement of operations
 
[b]   Gains (losses) are included in “Other service fees” in the statement of operations

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Nine months ended September 30, 2010
                                            Changes in    
                                            unrealized    
                                            gains (losses)    
                                            included in    
                    Purchases,                   earnings/OCI    
                    sales,                   related to    
                    issuances,                   assets and    
    Balance   Gains   settlements,   Transfers   Balance as   liabilities still    
    as of   (losses)   and   in (out)   of   held as of    
    January 1,   included in   paydowns   of Level   September   September    
(In millions)   2010   earnings/OCI   (net)   3   30, 2010   30, 2010    
 
Assets
                                                       
 
Continuing Operations
                                                       
Investment securities available-for-sale:
                                                       
Residential mortgage- backed securities — agencies
  $ 34     $ 1             ($27 )   $ 8                
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
  $ 34     $ 1             ($27 )   $ 8             [a]  
 
Trading account securities:
                                                       
Collateralized mortgage obligations
  $ 3                       $ 3                
Residential mortgage- backed securities— agencies
    224     $ 4       ($34 )     ($170 )     24                
Other
    3                         3                
 
Total trading account securities
  $ 230     $ 4       ($34 )     ($170 )   $ 30             [b]  
 
Mortgage servicing rights
  $ 170       ($20 )   $ 16           $ 166       ($12 )     [c]  
 
Total
  $ 434       ($15 )     ($18 )     ($197 )   $ 204       ($12 )        
 
 
[a]   Gains are included in OCI
 
[b]   Gains (losses) are included in “Trading account profit” in the statement of operations
 
[c]   Gains (losses) are included in “Other service fees” in the statement of operations

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Quarter ended September 30, 2009
                                            Changes in    
                                            unrealized    
                                            gains (losses)    
                                            included in    
                            Purchases,           earnings/OCI    
                            sales,           related to    
                    Increase   issuances,           assets and    
    Balance           (decrease)   settlements,   Balance as   liabilities still    
    as of   Gains (losses)   in accrued   and   of   held as of    
    June 30,   included in   interest   paydowns   September   September 30,    
(In millions)   2009   earnings/OCI   receivable   (net)   30, 2009   2009    
 
Assets
                                                       
 
Continuing Operations
                                                       
Investment securities available-for-sale:
                                                       
Residential mortgage- backed securities — agencies
  $ 35                   ($1 )   $ 34                
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
  $ 35                   ($1 )   $ 34                
 
Trading account securities:
                                                       
Collateralized mortgage obligations
  $ 5                   ($1 )   $ 4                
Residential mortgage- backed securities— agencies
    284     $ 1             (52 )     233     $ 1       [a]  
Other
    5       (1 )                 4                
 
Total trading account securities
  $ 294                   ($53 )   $ 241     $ 1          
 
Mortgage servicing rights
  $ 181       ($7 )         $ 6     $ 180       ($4 )     [b]  
 
Discontinued Operations
                                                       
Loans measured at fair value pursuant to fair value option
  $ 1                   ($1 )                 [c]  
 
Total
  $ 511       ($7 )           ($49 )   $ 455       ($3 )        
 
 
[a]   Gains (losses) are included in “Trading account profit” in the statement of operations
 
[b]   Gains (losses) are included in “Other service fees” in the statement of operations
 
[c]   Gains (losses) are included in “Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax” in the statement of operations

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Nine months ended September 30, 2009
                                            Changes in    
                                            unrealized    
                                            gains (losses)    
                                            included in    
                            Purchases,           earnings/OCI    
                            sales,           related to    
                    Increase   issuances,           assets and    
    Balance   Gains   (decrease)   settlements,           liabilities still    
    as of   (losses)   in accrued   and   Balance as of   held as of    
    January 1,   included in   interest   paydowns   September   September 30,    
(In millions)   2009   earnings/OCI   receivable   (net)   30, 2009   2009    
 
Assets
                                                       
Continuing Operations
                                                       
Investment securities available-for-sale:
                                                       
Mortgage-backed securities— agencies
  $ 37                   ($3 )   $ 34                
 
Total investment securities available-for-sale
  $ 37                   ($3 )   $ 34                
 
Trading account securities:
                                                       
Collateralized mortgage obligations
  $ 3                 $ 1     $ 4                
Residential mortgage- backed securities— agencies
    292     $ 2             (61 )     233     $ 5          
Other
    5       (1 )                 4                
 
Total trading account securities
  $ 300     $ 1             ($60 )   $ 241     $ 5       [a]  
 
Mortgage servicing rights
  $ 176       ($16 )         $ 20     $ 180       ($6 )     [b]  
 
Discontinued Operations
                                                       
Loans measured at fair value pursuant to fair value option
  $ 5     $ 1             ($6 )                 [c]  
 
Total
  $ 518       ($14 )           ($49 )   $ 455       ($1 )        
 
 
[a]   Gains (losses) are included in “Trading account profit” in the statement of operations
 
[b]   Gains (losses) are included in “Other service fees” in the statement of operations
 
[c]   Gains (losses) are included in “Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax” in the statement of operations
 
During the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2010, there were $113 million and $197 million, respectively, in transfers out of Level 3 for financial instruments measured at fair value on a recurring basis. These transfers resulted from exempt FNMA and GNMA mortgage-backed securities, which were transferred out of Level 3 and into Level 2, as a result of a change in valuation methodology from an internally-developed pricing matrix to pricing them based on a bond’s theoretical value from similar bonds defined by credit quality and market sector. Their fair value incorporates an option adjusted spread. Pursuant to the Corporation’s policy, these transfers were recognized as of the end of the reporting period. There were no transfers in and / or out of Level 1 during the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2010.
There were no transfers in and / or out of Level 3 for financial instruments measured at fair value on a recurring basis during the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2009. There were no transfers in and / or out of Level 1 and Level 2 during the quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2009.

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Gains and losses (realized and unrealized) included in earnings for the quarters and nine months ended September 30, 2010 and 2009 for Level 3 assets and liabilities included in the previous tables are reported in the consolidated statement of operations as follows:
                                 
    Quarter ended September 30, 2010   Nine months ended September 30, 2010
            Changes in           Changes in
            unrealized gains           unrealized gains
            (losses) relating to           (losses) relating to
    Total gains (losses)   assets / liabilities   Total gains (losses)   assets / liabilities
    included in   still held at   included in   still held at
(In millions)   earnings/OCI   reporting date   earnings/OCI   reporting date
 
Continuing Operations
                               
OCI
              $ 1        
Other service fees
    ($10 )     ($6 )     (20 )     ($12 )
Trading account profit
    1             4        
 
Total
    ($9 )     ($6 )     ($15 )     ($12 )
 
                                 
    Quarter ended September 30, 2009   Nine months ended September 30, 2009
            Changes in           Changes in
            unrealized gains           unrealized gains
            (losses) relating to           (losses) relating to
    Total gains (losses)   assets / liabilities   Total gains (losses)   assets / liabilities
    included in   still held at   included in   still held at
(In millions)   earnings/OCI   reporting date   earnings/OCI   reporting date
 
Continuing Operations
                               
Other service fees
    ($7 )     ($4 )     ($16 )     ($6 )
Trading account profit
          1       1       5  
Discontinued Operations
                               
Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax
                1        
 
Total
    ($7 )     ($3 )     ($14 )     ($1 )
 
Additionally, in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, the Corporation may be required to measure certain assets at fair value on a nonrecurring basis in periods subsequent to their initial recognition. The adjustments to fair value usually result from the application of lower of cost or fair value accounting, identification of impaired loans requiring specific reserves under ASC Section 310-10-35 “Accounting by Creditors for Impairment of a Loan”, or write-downs of individual assets. The following tables present financial and non-financial assets that were subject to a fair value measurement on a nonrecurring basis during the nine months ended September 30, 2010 and 2009, and which were still included in the consolidated statement of condition as of such dates. The amounts disclosed represent the aggregate fair value measurements of those assets as of the end of the reporting period.
                                 
Carrying value as of September 30, 2010
(In millions)   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Total
 
Assets
                               
 
Continuing Operations
                               
Loans [1]
              $ 649     $ 649  
Loans held-for-sale [2]
                2       2  
Other real estate owned [3]
                55       55  
 
Total
                  $ 706     $ 706  
 
 
[1]   Relates mostly to certain impaired collateral dependent loans. The impairment was measured based on the fair value of the collateral, which is derived from appraisals that take into consideration prices in observed transactions involving similar assets in similar locations, in accordance with the provisions of ASC Section 310-10-35.
 
[2]   Relates to lower of cost or fair value adjustments of loans held-for-sale and loans transferred from loans held-in-portfolio to loans held-for-sale. These adjustments were principally determined based on negotiated price terms for the loans.
 
[3]   Represents the fair value of foreclosed real estate owned that were measured at fair value.

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Carrying value as of September 30, 2009
(In millions)   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Total
 
Assets
                               
 
Continuing Operations
                               
Loans (1)
              $ 743     $ 743  
Other real estate owned (2)
                27       27  
Other foreclosed assets (2)
                6       6  
 
Total
              $ 776     $ 776  
 
 
[1]   Relates mostly to certain impaired collateral dependent loans. The impairment was measured based on the fair value of the collateral, which is derived from appraisals that take into consideration prices in observed transactions involving similar assets in similar locations, in accordance with the provisions of ASC Section 310-10-35.
 
[2]   Represents the fair value of foreclosed real estate and other collateral owned that were measured at fair value.
 
 
Following is a description of the Corporation’s valuation methodologies used for assets and liabilities measured at fair value. The disclosure requirements exclude certain financial instruments and non-financial instruments. Accordingly, the aggregate fair value of the financial instruments disclosed do not represent management’s estimate of the underlying value of the Corporation.
Trading Account Securities and Investment Securities Available-for-Sale
    U.S. Treasury securities: The fair value of U.S. Treasury securities is based on yields that are interpolated from the constant maturity treasury curve. These securities are classified as Level 2.
 
    Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities: The Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities include U.S. agency securities, which fair value is based on an active exchange market and on quoted market prices for similar securities. The U.S. agency securities are classified as Level 2.
 
    Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions: Obligations of Puerto Rico, States and political subdivisions include municipal bonds. The bonds are segregated and the like characteristics divided into specific sectors. Market inputs used in the evaluation process include all or some of the following: trades, bid price or spread, two sided markets, quotes, benchmark curves including but not limited to Treasury benchmarks, LIBOR and swap curves, market data feeds such as MSRB, discount and capital rates, and trustee reports. The municipal bonds are classified as Level 2.
 
    Mortgage-backed securities — agencies: Certain agency mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) are priced based on a bond’s theoretical value from similar bonds defined by credit quality and market sector. Their fair value incorporates an option adjusted spread. The agency MBS are classified as Level 2. Other agency MBS such as GNMA Puerto Rico Serials are priced using an internally-developed pricing matrix with quoted prices from local broker dealers. These particular MBS are classified as Level 3.
 
    Collateralized mortgage obligations: Agency and private collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMOs”) are priced based on a bond’s theoretical value from similar bonds defined by credit quality and market sector and for which fair value incorporates an option adjusted spread. The option adjusted spread model includes prepayment and volatility assumptions, ratings (whole loans collateral) and spread adjustments. These CMOs are classified as Level 2. Other CMOs, due to their limited liquidity, are classified as Level 3 due to the insufficiency of inputs such as broker quotes, executed trades, credit information and cash flows.
 
    Equity securities: Equity securities with quoted market prices obtained from an active exchange market are classified as Level 1. Other equity securities that do not trade in highly liquid markets are classified as Level 2.
 
    Corporate note (included as “other” in the “available-for-sale” category): The corporate note is priced based on a spread to the U.S. Treasury market and adjustments may apply based on observable market inputs such as sector, maturity, credit standing and reported trade frequencies. This corporate note is

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      classified as Level 2.
 
    Corporate securities and mutual funds (included as “other” in the “trading account securities” category): Quoted prices for these security types are obtained from broker dealers. Given that the quoted prices are for similar instruments or do not trade in highly liquid markets, the corporate securities and mutual funds are classified as Level 2. The important variables in determining the prices of Puerto Rico tax-exempt mutual fund shares are net asset value, dividend yield and type of assets in the fund. All funds trade based on a relevant dividend yield taking into consideration the aforementioned variables. In addition, demand and supply also affect the price. Corporate securities that trade less frequently or are in distress are classified as Level 3.
Mortgage servicing rights
Mortgage servicing rights (“MSRs”) do not trade in an active market with readily observable prices. MSRs are priced internally using a discounted cash flow model. The valuation model considers servicing fees, portfolio characteristics, prepayment assumptions, delinquency rates, late charges, other ancillary revenues, cost to service and other economic factors. Due to the unobservable nature of certain valuation inputs, the MSRs are classified as Level 3.
Derivatives
Interest rate swaps, interest rate caps and indexed options are traded in over-the-counter active markets. These derivatives are indexed to an observable interest rate benchmark, such as LIBOR or equity indexes, and are priced using an income approach based on present value and option pricing models using observable inputs. Other derivatives are liquid and have quoted prices, such as forward contracts or “to be announced securities” (“TBAs”). All of these derivatives are classified as Level 2. The non-performance risk is determined using internally-developed models that consider the collateral held, the remaining term, and the creditworthiness of the entity that bears the risk, and uses available public data or internally-developed data related to current spreads that denote their probability of default.
Equity appreciation instrument
Refer to Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements for a description of the terms of the equity appreciation instrument. The fair value of the equity appreciation instrument was estimated by determining a call option value using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model. The principal variables in determining the fair value of the equity appreciation instrument include the implied volatility determined based on the historical daily volatility of the Corporation’s common stock, the exercise price of the instrument, the price of the call option, and the risk-free rate. The equity appreciation instrument is classified as Level 2.
Loans held-in-portfolio considered impaired under ASC Section 310-10-35 that are collateral dependent
The impairment is measured based on the fair value of the collateral, which is derived from appraisals that take into consideration prices in observed transactions involving similar assets in similar locations, in accordance with the provisions of ASC Section 310-10-35. Currently, the associated loans considered impaired are classified as Level 3.
Loans measured at fair value pursuant to lower of cost or fair value adjustments
Loans measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis pursuant to lower of cost or fair value were priced based on bids received from potential buyers, secondary market prices, and discounted cash flow models which incorporate internally-developed assumptions for prepayments and credit loss estimates. These loans are classified as Level 3.
Other real estate owned and other foreclosed assets
Other real estate owned includes real estate properties securing mortgage, consumer, and commercial loans. Other foreclosed assets include automobiles securing auto loans. The fair value of foreclosed assets may be determined using an external appraisal, broker price opinion or an internal valuation. These foreclosed assets are classified as Level 3 given certain internal adjustments that may be made to external appraisals.

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Note 22 — Fair Value of Financial Instruments
The fair value of financial instruments is the amount at which an asset or obligation could be exchanged in a current transaction between willing parties, other than in a forced or liquidation sale. Fair value estimates are made at a specific point in time based on the type of financial instrument and relevant market information. Many of these estimates involve various assumptions and may vary significantly from amounts that could be realized in actual transactions.
The information about the estimated fair values of financial instruments presented hereunder excludes all nonfinancial instruments and certain other specific items.
Derivatives are considered financial instruments and their carrying value equals fair value.
For those financial instruments with no quoted market prices available, fair values have been estimated using present value calculations or other valuation techniques, as well as management’s best judgment with respect to current economic conditions, including discount rates, estimates of future cash flows, and prepayment assumptions.
The fair values reflected herein have been determined based on the prevailing interest rate environment as of September 30, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively. In different interest rate environments, fair value estimates can differ significantly, especially for certain fixed rate financial instruments. In addition, the fair values presented do not attempt to estimate the value of the Corporation’s fee generating businesses and anticipated future business activities, that is, they do not represent the Corporation’s value as a going concern. Accordingly, the aggregate fair value amounts presented do not represent the underlying value of the Corporation. The methods and assumptions used to estimate the fair values of significant financial instruments as of September 30, 2010 and December 31, 2009 are described in the paragraphs below.
Short-term financial assets and liabilities have relatively short maturities, or no defined maturities, and little or no credit risk. The carrying amounts of other liabilities reported in the consolidated statements of condition approximate fair value because of the short-term maturity of those instruments or because they carry interest rates which approximate market. Included in this category are: cash and due from banks, federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell, time deposits with other banks, bankers acceptances and assets sold under agreements to repurchase and short-term borrowings. The equity appreciation instrument is included in other liabilities and is accounted at fair value. Note 21 to the consolidated financial statements provides a description of the valuation methodology for the equity appreciation instrument. Resell and repurchase agreements with long-term maturities are valued using discounted cash flows based on market rates currently available for agreements with similar terms and remaining maturities.
Trading and investment securities, except for investments classified as other investment securities in the consolidated statement of condition, are financial instruments that regularly trade on secondary markets. The estimated fair value of these securities was determined using either market prices or dealer quotes, where available, or quoted market prices of financial instruments with similar characteristics. Trading account securities and securities available-for-sale are reported at their respective fair values in the consolidated statements of condition since they are marked-to-market for accounting purposes.
The estimated fair value for loans held-for-sale was based on secondary market prices, bids received from potential buyers and discounted cash flow models. The fair values of the loans held-in-portfolio have been determined for groups of loans with similar characteristics. Loans were segregated by type such as commercial, construction, residential mortgage, consumer, and credit cards. Each loan category was further segmented based on loan characteristics, including interest rate terms, credit quality and vintage. Generally, fair values were estimated based on an exit price by discounting scheduled cash flows for the segmented groups of loans using a discount rate that considers interest, credit and expected return by market participant under current market conditions. Additionally, prepayment, default and recovery assumptions have been applied in the mortgage loan portfolio valuations. Generally accepted accounting principles do not require a fair valuation of the lease financing portfolio, therefore it is included in the loans total at its carrying amount.
The fair value of deposits with no stated maturity, such as non-interest bearing demand deposits, savings, NOW, and money market accounts was, for purposes of this disclosure, equal to the amount payable on demand as of the

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respective dates. The fair value of certificates of deposit was based on the discounted value of contractual cash flows using interest rates being offered on certificates with similar maturities. The value of these deposits in a transaction between willing parties is in part dependent of the buyer’s ability to reduce the servicing cost and the attrition that sometimes occurs. Therefore, the amount a buyer would be willing to pay for these deposits could vary significantly from the presented fair value.
Long-term borrowings were valued using discounted cash flows, based on market rates currently available for debt with similar terms and remaining maturities and in certain instances using quoted market rates for similar instruments as of September 30, 2010 and December 31, 2009.
As part of the fair value estimation procedures of certain liabilities, including repurchase agreements (regular and structured) and FHLB advances, the Corporation considered, where applicable, the collateralization levels as part of its evaluation of non-performance risk. Also, for certificates of deposit, the non-performance risk was determined using internally-developed models that consider, where applicable, the collateral held, amounts insured, the remaining term, and the credit premium of the institution.
Refer to Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements for a description of the FDIC loss share indemnification asset, equity appreciation instrument issued to the FDIC and the contingent liability on unfunded loan commitments, which are separately disclosed in the table below and all relate to the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction. The latter two items are included as other liabilities in the consolidated statement of condition.
Commitments to extend credit were valued using the fees currently charged to enter into similar agreements. For those commitments where a future stream of fees is charged, the fair value was estimated by discounting the projected cash flows of fees on commitments. The fair value of letters of credit was based on fees currently charged on similar agreements.
Carrying or notional amounts, as applicable, and estimated fair values for financial instruments were:
                                 
    September 30, 2010   December 31, 2009
 
    Carrying   Fair   Carrying   Fair
(In thousands)   amount   value   amount   value
 
Financial Assets:
                               
Cash and money market investments
  $ 2,604,760     $ 2,604,760     $ 1,680,127     $ 1,680,127  
Trading securities
    483,192       483,192       462,436       462,436  
Investment securities available-for-sale
    5,741,483       5,741,483       6,694,714       6,694,714  
Investment securities held-to-maturity
    214,152       214,803       212,962       213,146  
Other investment securities
    158,309       159,622       164,149       165,497  
Loans held-for-sale
    115,088       120,916       90,796       91,542  
Loans held-in-portfolio, net
    24,904,715       22,181,399       22,451,909       20,021,224  
FDIC loss share indemnification asset
    3,308,959       3,371,118              
 
                               
Financial Liabilities:
                               
Deposits
  $ 27,740,045     $ 27,867,432     $ 25,924,894     $ 26,076,515  
Assets sold under agreements to repurchase
    2,358,139       2,523,779       2,632,790       2,759,438  
Short-term borrowings
    191,342       191,342       7,326       7,326  
Notes payable
    5,143,388       5,090,470       2,648,632       2,453,037  
Contingent liability on unfunded loan commitments
    120,162       120,162              
Equity appreciation instrument
    17,465       17,465              
 
                                 
    Notional   Fair   Notional   Fair
(In thousands)   Amount   Value   Amount   Value
 
Commitments to extend credit
  $ 6,297,380     $ 1,016     $ 7,013,148     $ 882  
Letters of credit
    134,663       1,296       147,647       1,565  
 

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Note 23 — Net Income per Common Share
The computation of net income per common share (“EPS”) follows:
                                 
    Quarter ended   Nine months ended
    September 30,   September 30,
 
(In thousands, except share information)   2010   2009   2010   2009
 
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
  $ 494,494       ($121,561 )   $ 353,611       ($340,720 )
Net loss from discontinued operations
          (3,427 )           (19,972 )
Deemed dividend on preferred stock [1]
                (191,667 )      
Preferred stock dividends [2]
          5,974             (39,857 )
Preferred stock discount accretion
          (1,040 )           (4,515 )
Favorable impact from exchange of shares of Series A and B preferred stock for common stock, net of issuance costs
          230,388             230,388  
Favorable impact from exchange of Series C preferred stock for trust preferred securities
          485,280             485,280  
 
Net income applicable to common stock
  $ 494,494     $ 595,614     $ 161,944     $ 310,604  
 
Average common shares outstanding
    1,021,374,014       425,672,578       839,196,564       330,325,348  
Average potential common shares
                312,961        
 
Average common shares outstanding — assuming dilution
    1,021,374,014       425,672,578       839,509,525       330,325,348  
 
 
                               
Basic and diluted EPS from continuing operations
  $ 0.48     $ 1.41     $ 0.19     $ 1.00  
Basic and diluted EPS from discontinued operations
          (0.01 )           (0.06 )
 
Basic and diluted EPS
  $ 0.48     $ 1.40     $ 0.19     $ 0.94  
 
 
[1]   Deemed dividend related to the issuance of depositary shares and the conversion of the preferred stock into shares of common stock in the second quarter of 2010.
 
[2]   Amount presented for the quarter ended September 30, 2009 represents the reversal of dividends on Series C preferred stock considered accrued as of June 30, 2009 for EPS purposes only. These cumulative dividends were not paid as dividends to the Series C preferred stockholders given the terms of the exchange agreement to New Trust Preferred Securities, which was effected in August 2009.
 
 
The conversion of contingently convertible perpetual non-cumulative preferred stock into shares of the Corporation’s common stock during the second quarter of 2010, resulted in a non-cash beneficial conversion of $191.7 million, representing the intrinsic value between the conversion rate of $3.00 and the common stock closing price of $3.50 on April 13, 2010, the date the preferred shares were offered. The beneficial conversion was recorded as a deemed dividend to the preferred stockholders reducing retained earnings, with a corresponding offset to surplus (paid in capital), and thus did not affect total stockholders’ equity or the book value of the common stock. However, the deemed dividend decreased the net income applicable to common stock and affected the calculation of basic and diluted EPS for the nine months ended September 30, 2010. Moreover, in computing diluted EPS, dilutive convertible securities that remained outstanding for the period prior to actual conversion were not included as average potential common shares because the effect would have been antidilutive. In computing both basic and diluted EPS, the common shares issued upon actual conversion were included in the weighted average calculation of common shares, after the date of conversion, provided that they remained outstanding.
Potential common shares consist of common stock issuable under the assumed exercise of stock options and restricted stock awards using the treasury stock method. This method assumes that the potential common shares are issued and the proceeds from exercise, in addition to the amount of compensation cost attributed to future services, are used to purchase common stock at the exercise date. The difference between the number of potential shares issued and the shares purchased is added as incremental shares to the actual number of shares outstanding to compute diluted earnings per share. Warrants, stock options and restricted stock awards that result in lower potential shares issued than shares purchased under the treasury stock method are not included in the computation of dilutive earnings per share since their inclusion would have an antidilutive effect in earnings per common share.
For the quarter and nine-month period ended September 30, 2010, there were 2,530,137 and 2,537,563 weighted average antidilutive stock options outstanding, respectively (September 30, 2009 — 2,674,505 and 2,770,846). Additionally, the Corporation has outstanding a warrant to purchase 20,932,836 shares of common stock, which has an antidilutive effect as of September 30, 2010.

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Note 24 — Other Service Fees
The caption of other service fees in the consolidated statements of operations consists of the following major categories:
                                 
    Quarter ended   Nine months ended
    September 30,   September 30,
(In thousands)   2010   2009   2010   2009
 
Debit card fees
  $ 27,711     $ 26,986     $ 83,480     $ 80,867  
Credit card fees and discounts
    24,382       23,497       73,692       70,951  
Processing fees
    15,258       13,638       43,390       40,773  
Insurance fees
    11,855       11,463       34,929       36,014  
Sale and administration of investment products
    11,379       8,181       28,791       25,204  
Other fees
    10,237       13,849       41,585       44,775  
 
Total other service fees
  $ 100,822     $ 97,614     $ 305,867     $ 298,584  
 
Note 25 — Pension and Postretirement Benefits
The Corporation has noncontributory defined benefit pension plans (the “retirement plans”) and supplementary benefit pension plans for regular employees of certain of its subsidiaries. Effective May 1, 2009, the accrual of the benefits under the BPPR retirement plan was frozen to all participants. Pursuant to the amendment, the retirement plan participants will not receive any additional credit for compensation earned and service performed after April 30, 2009 for purposes of calculating benefits under the retirement plans.
During the third quarter of 2010, the Corporation amended the pension and postretirement benefits as a result of the EVERTEC sale. The amendment to the pension plan increased the pension plan liability by approximately $6.3 million, which will be amortized as pension cost in future periods.
During the second quarter of 2010, the Corporation settled its U.S. retirement plan, which had been frozen in 2007. The U.S. retirement plan assets are expected to be distributed to plan participants during the fourth quarter of 2010.
The components of net periodic pension cost for the quarters and nine months ended September 30, 2010 and 2009 were as follows:
                                                                 
                    Benefit Restoration                   Benefit Restoration
    Pension Plans   Plans   Pension Plans   Plans
 
    Quarters ended   Quarters ended   Nine months ended   Nine months ended
    September 30,   September 30,   September 30,   September 30,
(In thousands)   2010   2009   2010   2009   2010   2009   2010   2009
 
Service cost
                                $ 3,330           $ 341  
Interest cost
  $ 7,804     $ 8,041     $ 384     $ 391     $ 23,710       24,630     $ 1,153       1,225  
Expected return on plan assets
    (7,655 )     (6,221 )     (403 )     (307 )     (23,208 )     (19,320 )     (1,210 )     (932 )
Amortization of prior service cost (credit)
                                  44             (8 )
Amortization of net loss
    2,167       3,203       99       185       6,579       10,590       297       683  
 
Net periodic cost
  $ 2,316     $ 5,023     $ 80     $ 269     $ 7,081     $ 19,274     $ 240     $ 1,309  
Curtailment loss (gain)
                                  820             (341 )
Settlement loss
                            3,380                    
 
Total cost
  $ 2,316     $ 5,023     $ 80     $ 269     $ 10,461     $ 20,094     $ 240     $ 968  
 
During the nine months ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation made contributions to the pension and benefit restoration plans amounting to $23.5 million. The total contributions expected to be paid during the year 2010 for the pension and benefit restoration plans amount to approximately $25.8 million.

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The Corporation also provides certain health care benefits for retired employees of certain subsidiaries. The components of net periodic postretirement benefit cost for the quarters and nine months ended September 30, 2010 and 2009 were as follows:
                                 
    Quarters ended   Nine months ended
    September 30,   September 30,
(In thousands)   2010   2009   2010   2009
 
Service cost
  $ 432     $ 549     $ 1,296     $ 1,647  
Interest cost
    1,609       2,026       4,826       6,078  
Amortization of prior service cost
    (262 )     (261 )     (785 )     (784 )
Amortization of net gain
    (294 )           (882 )      
 
Net periodic cost
  $ 1,485     $ 2,314     $ 4,455     $ 6,941  
Termination benefit cost
    671             671        
 
Total cost
  $ 2,156     $ 2,314     $ 5,126     $ 6,941  
 
Contributions made to the postretirement benefit plan for the nine months ended September 30, 2010 amounted to approximately $3.9 million. The total contributions expected to be paid during the year 2010 for the postretirement benefit plan amount to approximately $5.2 million.
Note 26 — Stock-Based Compensation
The Corporation maintained a Stock Option Plan (the “Stock Option Plan”), which permitted the granting of incentive awards in the form of qualified stock options, incentive stock options, or non-statutory stock options of the Corporation. In April 2004, the Corporation’s shareholders adopted the Popular, Inc. 2004 Omnibus Incentive Plan (the “Incentive Plan”), which replaced and superseded the Stock Option Plan. The adoption of the Incentive Plan did not alter the original terms of the grants made under the Stock Option Plan prior to the adoption of the Incentive Plan.
Stock Option Plan
Employees and directors of the Corporation or any of its subsidiaries were eligible to participate in the Stock Option Plan. The Board of Directors or the Compensation Committee of the Board had the absolute discretion to determine the individuals that were eligible to participate in the Stock Option Plan. This plan provided for the issuance of Popular, Inc.’s common stock at a price equal to its fair market value at the grant date, subject to certain plan provisions. The shares are to be made available from authorized but unissued shares of common stock or treasury stock. The Corporation’s policy has been to use authorized but unissued shares of common stock to cover each grant. The maximum option term is ten years from the date of grant. Unless an option agreement provides otherwise, all options granted are 20% exercisable after the first year and an additional 20% is exercisable after each subsequent year, subject to an acceleration clause at termination of employment due to retirement.
The following table presents information on stock options outstanding as of September 30, 2010:
                                         
(Not in thousands)
                    Weighted-Average        
            Weighted-Average   Remaining Life of   Options   Weighted-Average
Exercise Price   Options   Exercise Price of   Options Outstanding   Exercisable   Exercise Price of
Range per Share   Outstanding   Options Outstanding   In Years   (fully vested)   Options Exercisable
 
$14.39 - $18.50
    1,231,412     $ 15.84       1.99       1,231,412     $ 15.84  
$19.25 - $27.20
    1,298,725     $ 25.21       3.74       1,298,725     $ 25.21  
 
$14.39 - $27.20
    2,530,137     $ 20.65       2.89       2,530,137     $ 20.65  
 
There was no intrinsic value of options outstanding as of September 30, 2010 (September 30, 2009 — $0.3 million). There was no intrinsic value of options exercisable as of September 30, 2010 and 2009.

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The following table summarizes the stock option activity and related information:
                 
 
    Options   Weighted-Average
(Not in thousands)   Outstanding   Exercise Price
 
Outstanding as of January 1, 2009
    2,965,843     $ 20.59  
Granted
           
Exercised
           
Forfeited
    (59,631 )     26.42  
Expired
    (353,549 )     19.25  
 
Outstanding as of December 31, 2009
    2,552,663     $ 20.64  
Granted
           
Exercised
           
Forfeited
           
Expired
    (22,526 )     19.56  
 
Outstanding as of September 30, 2010
    2,530,137     $ 20.65  
 
The stock options exercisable as of September 30, 2010 totaled 2,530,137 (September 30, 2009 — 2,585,523). There were no stock options exercised during the quarters and nine-month periods ended September 30, 2010 and 2009. Thus, there was no intrinsic value of options exercised during the quarters and nine month-periods ended September 30, 2010 and 2009.
There were no new stock option grants issued by the Corporation under the Stock Option Plan during 2009 and 2010.
For the quarter ended September 30, 2010, there was no stock option expense recognized (September 30, 2009 — $0.1 million, with a tax benefit of $40 thousand). For the nine months ended September 30, 2010, there was no stock option expense recognized (September 30, 2009 — $162 thousand, with a tax benefit of $45 thousand).
Incentive Plan
The Incentive Plan permits the granting of incentive awards in the form of Annual Incentive Awards, Long-term Performance Unit Awards, Stock Options, Stock Appreciation Rights, Restricted Stock, Restricted Units or Performance Shares. Participants in the Incentive Plan are designated by the Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors (or its delegate as determined by the Board). Employees and directors of the Corporation and / or any of its subsidiaries are eligible to participate in the Incentive Plan. The shares may be made available from common stock purchased by the Corporation for such purpose, authorized but unissued shares of common stock or treasury stock. The Corporation’s policy with respect to the shares of restricted stock has been to purchase such shares in the open market to cover each grant.
Under the Incentive Plan, the Corporation has issued restricted shares, which become vested based on the employees’ continued service with Popular. Unless otherwise stated in an agreement, the compensation cost associated with the shares of restricted stock is determined based on a two-prong vesting schedule. The first part is vested ratably over five years commencing at the date of grant and the second part is vested at termination of employment after attainment of 55 years of age and 10 years of service. The five-year vesting part is accelerated at termination of employment after attaining 55 years of age and 10 years of service.

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The following table summarizes the restricted stock activity under the Incentive Plan for members of management:
                 
 
    Restricted   Weighted-Average
(Not in thousands)   Stock   Grant Date Fair Value
 
Non-vested as of January 1, 2009
    248,339     $ 22.83  
Granted
           
Vested
    (104,791 )     21.93  
Forfeited
    (5,036 )     19.95  
 
Non-vested as of December 31, 2009
    138,512     $ 23.62  
Granted
    1,525,416       2.70  
Vested
    (314,284 )     8.34  
Forfeited
    (185,844 )     3.21  
 
Non-vested as of September 30, 2010
    1,163,800     $ 3.58  
 
During the quarter ended September 30, 2010, no shares of restricted stock were awarded to management under the Incentive Plan. During the nine-month period ended September 30, 2010, 1,525,416 shares of restricted stock were awarded to management under the Incentive Plan, from which 1,253,551 shares of restricted stock were awarded to management consistent with the requirements of the TARP Interim Final Rule. The shares of restricted stock, which were awarded to management consistent with the requirements of the TARP Interim Final Rule, were determined upon consideration of management’s execution of critical 2009 initiatives to manage the Corporation’s liquidity and capitalization, strategically reposition its United States operations, and improve management effectiveness and cost control. The shares will vest on the secondary anniversary of the grant date, and they may become payable in 25% increments as the Corporation repays each 25% portion of the aggregate financial assistance received under the United States Treasury Department’s Capital Purchase Program under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008. In addition, the grants are also subject to further performance criteria as the Corporation must achieve profitability for at least one fiscal year for awards to be payable. During the quarter and nine-month period ended September 30, 2009, no shares of restricted stock were awarded to management under the Incentive Plan.
Beginning in 2007, the Corporation authorized the issuance of performance shares, in addition to restricted shares, under the Incentive Plan. The performance share awards consist of the opportunity to receive shares of Popular, Inc.’s common stock provided that the Corporation achieves certain performance goals during a three-year performance cycle. The compensation cost associated with the performance shares is recorded ratably over a three-year performance period. The performance shares are granted at the end of the three-year period and vest at grant date, except when the participant’s employment is terminated by the Corporation without cause. In such case, the participant would receive a pro-rata amount of shares calculated as if the Corporation would have met the performance goal for the performance period. During the nine months ended September 30, 2010, 41,710 shares have been granted under this plan (September 30, 2009 — 35,397).
During the quarter ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation recognized $0.6 million of restricted stock expense related to management incentive awards, with tax benefit of $0.2 million (September 30, 2009 — $0.6 million, with a tax benefit of $0.2 million). For the nine-month period ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation recognized $0.7 million of restricted stock expense related to management incentive awards, with a tax benefit of $0.3 million (September 30, 2009 — $1.4 million, with a tax benefit of $0.5 million). The fair market value of the restricted stock vested was $3.2 million at grant date and $0.9 million at vesting date. This triggers a shortfall, net of windfalls, of $2.3 million that was recorded as an additional income tax expense at the applicable income tax rate, net of the deferred tax asset valuation allowance. During the quarter ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation recognized $0.3 million of performance shares expense, with a tax benefit of $0.1 million (September 30, 2009 —$0.3 million, with a tax benefit of $107 thousand). During the nine-month period ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation recognized $0.5 million of performance share expense, with a tax benefit of $0.2 million (September 30, 2009 — $0.6 million, with a tax benefit of $129 thousand). The total unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested restricted stock awards and performance shares to members of management as of September 30, 2010 was $2.2 million and is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 3 years.

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The following table summarizes the restricted stock activity under the Incentive Plan for members of the Board of Directors:
                 
    Restricted   Weighted-Average
(Not in thousands)   Stock   Grant Date Fair Value
 
Non-vested as of January 1, 2009
           
Granted
    270,515     $ 2.62  
Vested
    (270,515 )     2.62  
Forfeited
           
 
Non-vested as of December 31, 2009
           
Granted
    272,828     $ 2.97  
Vested
    (272,828 )     2.97  
Forfeited
           
 
Non-vested as of September 30, 2010
           
 
During the quarter ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation granted 30,434 shares of restricted stock to members of the Board of Directors of Popular, Inc. and BPPR, which became vested at grant date (September 30, 2009 — 78,070). During this period, the Corporation recognized $0.1 million of restricted stock expense related to these restricted stock grants, with a tax benefit of $48 thousand (September 30, 2009 — $0.1 million, with a tax benefit of $47 thousand). For the nine-month period ended September 30, 2010, the Corporation granted 272,828 shares of restricted stock to members of the Board of Directors of Popular, Inc. and BPPR, which became vested at grant date (September 30, 2009 — 251,993). During this period, the Corporation recognized $0.4 million of restricted stock expense related to these restricted stock grants, with a tax benefit of $0.2 million (September 30, 2009 — $0.3 million, with a tax benefit of $141 thousand). The fair value at vesting date of the restricted stock vested during 2010 for directors was $0.8 million.
Note 27 — Income Taxes
The reconciliation of unrecognized tax benefits was as follows:
                 
(In millions)   2010     2009  
 
Balance as of January 1
  $ 41.8     $ 40.5  
Additions for tax positions — January through March
    0.4       1.0  
Reduction as a result of settlements — January through March
    (14.3 )     (0.6 )
 
Balance as of March 31
    27.9     $ 40.9  
Additions for tax positions — April through June
    0.2       1.3  
Reduction for tax positions — April through June
    (1.6 )      
 
Balance as of June 30
    26.5     $ 42.2  
Additions for tax positions — July through September
    3.7       0.7  
Additions for tax positions taken in prior years — July through September
    3.5        
Reduction as a result of lapse of statute of limitations — July through September
    (3.7 )      
Reduction for tax positions — July through September
    (1.2 )     (1.8 )
 
Balance as of September 30
  $ 28.8     $ 41.1  
 
As of September 30, 2010, the related accrued interest approximated $6.5 million (September 30, 2009 — $6.3 million). Management determined that as of September 30, 2010 and 2009 there was no need to accrue for the payment of penalties.
After consideration of the effect on U.S. federal tax of unrecognized U.S. state tax benefits, the total amount of unrecognized tax benefits, including U.S. and Puerto Rico, that if recognized, would affect the Corporation’s effective tax rate, was approximately $33.8 million as of September 30, 2010 (September 30, 2009 — $45.7 million).

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The amount of unrecognized tax benefits may increase or decrease in the future for various reasons including adding amounts for current tax year positions, expiration of open income tax returns due to the statutes of limitation, changes in management’s judgment about the level of uncertainty, status of examinations, litigation and legislative activity and the addition or elimination of uncertain tax positions.
The Corporation and its subsidiaries file income tax returns in Puerto Rico, the U.S. federal jurisdiction, various U.S. states and political subdivisions, and foreign jurisdictions. As of September 30, 2010, the following years remain subject to examination in the U.S. Federal jurisdiction: 2008 and thereafter; and in the Puerto Rico jurisdiction, 2006 and thereafter. During 2010, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) completed an examination of the Corporation’s U.S. operations tax return for 2007, and as a result, the Corporation recognized a tax benefit of $14.3 million during the first quarter of 2010.
The Corporation does not anticipate a significant change to the total amount of unrecognized tax benefits within the next 12 months.
The following table presents the components of the Corporation’s deferred tax assets and liabilities.
                 
    September 30,   December 31,
(In thousands)   2010   2009
 
Deferred tax assets:
               
Tax credits available for carryforward
  $ 8,310     $ 11,026  
Net operating loss and donation carryforward available
    972,397       843,968  
Postretirement and pension benefits
    95,621       103,979  
Deferred loan origination fees
    7,797       7,880  
Allowance for loan losses
    533,611       536,277  
Deferred gains
    13,163       14,040  
Accelerated depreciation
    2,329       2,418  
Intercompany deferred gains
    4,818       7,015  
Other temporary differences
    20,969       39,096  
 
Total gross deferred tax assets
  $ 1,659,015     $ 1,565,699  
 
Deferred tax liabilities:
               
Differences between assigned values and the tax basis of the assets and liabilities recognized in purchase business combinations
  $ 63,977     $ 25,896  
Difference in outside basis between financial and tax reporting on sale of a business
    11,057        
Deferred loan origination costs
    8,280       9,708  
Unrealized net gain on trading and available-for-sale securities
    56,954       30,323  
Other temporary differences
    1,195       5,923  
 
Total gross deferred tax liabilities
  $ 141,463     $ 71,850  
 
Gross deferred tax assets less liabilities
  $ 1,517,552     $ 1,493,849  
Less: Valuation allowance
    1,191,951       1,129,882  
 
Net deferred tax assets
  $ 325,601     $ 363,967  
 
The net deferred tax asset shown in the table above as of September 30, 2010 is reflected in the consolidated statement of condition as $336.7 million in deferred tax assets (in the “other assets” caption) and $11.1 million in deferred tax liabilities (in the “other liabilities” caption), reflecting the aggregate deferred tax assets or liabilities of individual tax-paying subsidiaries of the Corporation.
A deferred tax asset should be reduced by a valuation allowance if based on the weight of all available evidence; it is more likely than not (a likelihood of more than 50%) that some portion or the entire deferred tax asset will not be realized. The valuation allowance should be sufficient to reduce the deferred tax asset to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. The determination of whether a deferred tax asset is realizable is based on weighting all available evidence, including both positive and negative evidence. The realization of deferred tax assets, including carryforwards and deductible temporary differences, depends upon the existence of sufficient taxable income of the same character during the carryback or carryforward period. The analysis considers all sources of taxable income available to realize the deferred tax asset, including the future reversal of existing taxable temporary

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differences, future taxable income exclusive of reversing temporary differences and carryforwards, taxable income in prior carryback years and tax-planning strategies.
The Corporation’s U.S. mainland operations are in a cumulative loss position for the three-year period ended September 30, 2010. For purposes of assessing the realization of the deferred tax assets in the U.S. mainland, this cumulative taxable loss position is considered significant negative evidence and has caused management to conclude that the Corporation will not be able to realize the associated deferred tax assets in the future. As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation recorded a valuation allowance of $1.2 billion on the deferred tax asset of its U.S. operations. As of September 30, 2010, the Corporation’s deferred tax assets (net of deferred tax liability) related to its Puerto Rico operations amounted to $345.8 million and the deferred tax liability, net of the valuation allowance, of its U.S. operations amounted to $20.2 million. The Corporation assessed the realization of the Puerto Rico portion of the net deferred tax asset and based on the weighting of all available evidence has concluded that it is more likely than not that such net deferred tax assets will be realized.
Note 28 — Supplemental Disclosure on the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
Additional disclosures on non-cash activities for the nine-month period are listed in the following table:
                 
(In thousands)   September 30, 2010   September 30, 2009
 
Non-cash activities:
               
Loans transferred to other real estate
  $ 147,577     $ 116,200  
Loans transferred to other property
    28,785       29,331  
 
Total loans transferred to foreclosed assets
    176,362       145,531  
Transfers from loans held-in-portfolio to loans held-for-sale
    24,458       32,270  
Transfers from loans held-for-sale to loans held-in-portfolio
    9,679       175,043  
Loans securitized into investment securities [a]
    633,821       1,112,061  
Recognition of mortgage servicing rights on securitizations or asset transfers
    11,909       19,640  
Treasury stock retired
          207,139  
Change in par value of common stock
          1,689,389  
Conversion of preferred stock to common stock:
               
Preferred stock converted
    (1,150,000 )      
Common stock issued
    1,341,667        
Trust preferred securities exchanged for new common stock issued:
               
Trust preferred securities exchanged
          (397,911 )
New common stock issued
          317,652  
Preferred stock exchanged for new common stock issued:
               
Preferred stock exchanged (Series A and B)
          (524,079 )
New common stock issued
          293,691  
Preferred stock exchanged for new trust preferred securities issued:
               
Preferred stock exchanged (Series C)
          (901,165 )
New trust preferred securities issued (junior subordinated debentures)
          415,885  
 
[a]   Includes loans securitized into investment securities and subsequently sold before quarter end.
 
 
For the nine months ended September 30, 2010 the changes in operating assets and liabilities included in the reconciliation of net income to net cash provided by operating activities, as well as the changes in assets and liabilities presented in the investing and financing sections are net of the effect of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed from the Westernbank FDIC-assisted transaction. Refer to Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements for the composition and balances of the assets and liabilities recorded at fair value by the Corporation on April 30, 2010.
The cash received in the transaction, which amounted to $261 million, is presented in the investing activities section of the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows as “Cash received from acquisition”.
Note 29 — Segment Reporting
The Corporation’s corporate structure consists of two reportable segments — Banco Popular de Puerto Rico and Banco Popular North America.

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As discussed in Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements, on September 30, 2010, the Corporation completed the sale of a 51% ownership interest in EVERTEC, which included the merchant acquiring business of BPPR. EVERTEC was reported as a reportable segment prior to September 30, 2010, while the merchant acquiring business was originally included in the BPPR reportable segment through June 30, 2010. As a result of the sale, the Corporation no longer presents EVERTEC as a reportable segment and therefore, historical financial information for the processing and merchant acquiring businesses has been reclassified under Corporate group for all periods presented. Additionally, the Corporation retained EVERTEC DE VENEZUELA, C.A. and its equity investments in CONTADO and Serfinsa, which were included in the EVERTEC reportable segment through June 30, 2010, and are now also included in the Corporate group for all periods presented. Revenue from the remaining ownership interest in EVERTEC will be prospectively reported as non-interest income in the Corporate group.
Management determined the reportable segments based on the internal reporting used to evaluate performance and to assess where to allocate resources. The segments were determined based on the organizational structure, which focuses primarily on the markets the segments serve, as well as on the products and services offered by the segments.
Banco Popular de Puerto Rico:
Given that Banco Popular de Puerto Rico constitutes a significant portion of the Corporation’s results of operations and total assets as of September 30, 2010, additional disclosures are provided for the business areas included in this reportable segment, as described below:
  Commercial banking represents the Corporation’s banking operations conducted at BPPR, which are targeted mainly to corporate, small and middle size businesses. It includes aspects of the lending and depository businesses, as well as other finance and advisory services. BPPR allocates funds across business areas based on duration matched transfer pricing at market rates. This area also incorporates income related with the investment of excess funds, as well as a proportionate share of the investment function of BPPR.
  Consumer and retail banking represents the branch banking operations of BPPR which focus on retail clients. It includes the consumer lending business operations of BPPR, as well as the lending operations of Popular Auto and Popular Mortgage. Popular Auto focuses on auto and lease financing, while Popular Mortgage focuses principally in residential mortgage loan originations. The consumer and retail banking area also incorporates income related with the investment of excess funds from the branch network, as well as a proportionate share of the investment function of BPPR.
  Other financial services include the trust and asset management service units of BPPR, the brokerage and investment banking operations of Popular Securities, and the insurance agency and reinsurance businesses of Popular Insurance, Popular Insurance V.I., Popular Risk Services, and Popular Life Re. Most of the services that are provided by these subsidiaries generate profits based on fee income.
Banco Popular North America:
Banco Popular North America’s reportable segment consists of the banking operations of BPNA, E-LOAN, Popular Equipment Finance, Inc. and Popular Insurance Agency, U.S.A. BPNA operates through a retail branch network in the U.S. mainland, while E-LOAN supports BPNA’s deposit gathering through its online platform. All direct lending activities at E-LOAN were ceased during the fourth quarter of 2008. Popular Equipment Finance, Inc. also holds a running-off loan portfolio as this subsidiary ceased originating loans during 2009. Popular Insurance Agency, U.S.A. offers investment and insurance services across the BPNA branch network.
The Corporate group consists primarily of the holding companies: Popular, Inc., Popular North America and Popular International Bank, including the equity investments in CONTADO and Serfinsa. Also, as discussed previously, it includes the results of EVERTEC for all periods presented. The Corporate group also includes the expenses of certain corporate areas that are identified as critical to the organization: Finance, Risk Management and Legal.
The accounting policies of the individual operating segments are the same as those of the Corporation. Transactions between reportable segments are primarily conducted at market rates, resulting in profits that are eliminated for reporting consolidated results of operations.

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The results of operations included in the tables below for the quarter ended September 30, 2009 exclude the results of operations of the discontinued business of PFH. Segment assets as of September 30, 2009 also exclude the assets of the discontinued operations.
2010
For the quarter ended September 30, 2010
                                 
                            Total
    Banco Popular de   Banco Popular   Intersegment   Reportable
(In thousands)   Puerto Rico   North America   Eliminations   Segments
 
Net interest income
  $ 336,580     $ 77,465           $ 414,045  
Provision for loan losses
    182,153       32,860             215,013  
Non-interest income
    92,937       13,161             106,098  
Amortization of intangibles
    1,561       681             2,242  
Depreciation expense
    10,024       2,160             12,184  
(Gain) loss on early extinguishment of debt
    (27 )     9,725             9,698  
Other operating expenses
    210,264       58,024             268,288  
Income tax expense
    12,996       1,798             14,794  
 
Net income (loss)
  $ 12,546       ($14,622 )           ($2,076 )
 
Segment Assets
  $ 31,129,147     $ 9,328,402       ($34,485 )   $ 40,423,064  
 
For the quarter ended September 30, 2010
                         
(In thousands)   Corporate   Eliminations   Popular, Inc.
 
Net interest (expense) income
    ($27,289 )   $ 162     $ 386,918  
Provision for loan losses
                215,013  
Non-interest income
    730,583       (40,157 )     796,524  
Amortization of intangibles
    169             2,411  
Depreciation expense
    4,141             16,325  
Loss on early extinguishment of debt
    15,750             25,448  
Other operating expenses
    99,399       (40,324 )     327,363  
Income tax expense
    87,382       212       102,388  
 
Net income
  $ 496,453     $ 117     $ 494,494  
 
Segment Assets
  $ 5,580,042       ($5,182,390 )   $ 40,820,716  
 
For the nine months ended September 30, 2010
                                 
                            Total
    Banco Popular de   Banco Popular   Intersegment   Reportable
(In thousands)   Puerto Rico   North America   Eliminations   Segments
 
Net interest income
  $ 787,923     $ 231,642           $ 1,019,565  
Provision for loan losses
    412,792       244,679             657,471  
Non-interest income
    327,920       45,646             373,566  
Amortization of intangibles
    3,870       2,501             6,371  
Depreciation expense
    29,097       7,041             36,138  
Loss on early extinguishment of debt
    951       9,725             10,676  
Other operating expenses
    584,283       186,575             770,858  
Income tax expense
    26,304       3,382             29,686  
 
Net income (loss)
  $ 58,546       ($176,615 )           ($118,069 )
 

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For the nine months ended September 30, 2010
                         
(In thousands)   Corporate   Eliminations   Popular, Inc.
 
Net interest (expense) income
    ($85,241 )   $ 487     $ 934,811  
Provision for loan losses
                657,471  
Non-interest income
    905,146       (108,464 )     1,170,248  
Amortization of intangibles
    544             6,915  
Depreciation expense
    10,946             47,084  
Loss on early extinguishment of debt
    15,750             26,426  
Other operating expenses
    237,082       (107,489 )     900,451  
Income tax expense
    82,983       432       113,101  
 
Net income
  $ 472,600       ($920 )   $ 353,611  
 
2009
For the quarter ended September 30, 2009
                                 
                            Total
    Banco Popular de   Banco Popular   Intersegment   Reportable
(In thousands)   Puerto Rico   North America   Eliminations   Segments
 
Net interest income
  $ 217,750     $ 77,588           $ 295,338  
Provision for loan losses
    153,350       177,713             331,063  
Non-interest income
    109,083       6,395             115,478  
Amortization of intangibles
    1,270       910             2,180  
Depreciation expense
    9,316       2,679             11,995  
Loss on early extinguishment of debt
    955                   955  
Other operating expenses
    175,412       70,045             245,457  
Income tax expense
    77       2,553             2,630  
 
Net loss
    ($13,547 )     ($169,917 )           ($183,464 )
 
Segment Assets
  $ 23,868,954     $ 11,443,083       ($29,284 )   $ 35,282,753  
 
For the quarter ended September 30, 2009
                         
(In thousands)   Corporate   Eliminations   Popular, Inc.
 
Net interest (expense) income
    ($19,232 )   $ 283     $ 276,389  
Provision for loan losses
                331,063  
Non-interest income
    83,201       (38,635 )     160,044  
Amortization of intangibles
    199             2,379  
Depreciation expense
    3,435             15,430  
Gain on early extinguishment of debt
    (78,337 )     (1,922 )     (79,304 )
Other operating expenses
    69,767       (33,129 )     282,095  
Income tax expense
    2,976       725       6,331  
 
Net income (loss)
  $ 65,929       ($4,026 )     ($121,561 )
 
Segment Assets
  $ 5,523,711       ($5,168,660 )   $ 35,637,804  
 

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For the nine months ended September 30, 2009
                                 
                            Total
    Banco Popular de   Banco Popular   Intersegment   Reportable
(In thousands)   Puerto Rico   North America   Eliminations   Segments
 
Net interest income
  $ 650,679     $ 234,929           $ 885,608  
Provision for loan losses
    486,343       566,693             1,053,036  
Non-interest income
    562,466       15,892             578,358  
Amortization of intangibles
    3,869       2,731             6,600  
Depreciation expense
    28,463       8,258       ($22 )     36,699  
Loss on early extinguishment of debt
    955                   955  
Other operating expenses
    530,174       236,453       (5 )     766,622  
Income tax benefit
    (4,239 )     (5,692 )     11       (9,920 )
 
Net income (loss)
  $ 167,580       ($557,622 )   $ 16       ($390,026 )
 
For the nine months ended September 30, 2009
                         
(In thousands)   Corporate   Eliminations   Popular, Inc.
 
Net interest (expense) income
    ($54,489 )   $ 816     $ 831,935  
Provision for loan losses
                1,053,036  
Non-interest income
    246,245       (103,989 )     720,614  
Amortization of intangibles
    618             7,218  
Depreciation expense
    12,334             49,033  
Gain on early extinguishment of debt
    (78,337 )     (1,922 )     (79,304 )
Other operating expenses
    210,136       (98,263 )     878,495  
Income tax benefit
    (6,120 )     831       (15,209 )
 
Net income (loss)
  $ 53,125       ($3,819 )     ($340,720 )
 
Additional disclosures with respect to the Banco Popular de Puerto Rico reportable segment are as follows:
2010
For the quarter ended September 30, 2010
                                         
                    Other           Total Banco
    Commercial   Consumer and   Financial           Popular de
(In thousands)   Banking   Retail Banking   Services   Eliminations   Puerto Rico
 
Net interest income
  $ 164,890     $ 169,401     $ 2,240     $ 49     $ 336,580  
Provision for loan losses
    155,561       26,592                   182,153  
Non-interest income
    891       65,951       26,321       (226 )     92,937  
Amortization of intangibles
    178       1,244       139             1,561  
Depreciation expense
    4,482       5,245       297             10,024  
Gain on early extinguishment of debt
    (27 )                       (27 )
Other operating expenses
    71,588       121,229       17,543       (96 )     210,264  
Income tax (benefit) expense
    (25,120 )     33,993       4,165       (42 )     12,996  
 
Net (loss) income
    ($40,881 )   $ 47,049     $ 6,417       ($39 )   $ 12,546  
 
Segment Assets
  $ 16,242,839     $ 22,081,935     $ 974,816       ($8,170,443 )   $ 31,129,147  
 

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For the nine months ended September 30, 2010
                                         
                    Other           Total Banco
    Commercial   Consumer and   Financial           Popular de
(In thousands)   Banking   Retail Banking   Services   Eliminations   Puerto Rico
 
Net interest income
  $ 309,391     $ 471,221     $ 7,130     $ 181     $ 787,923  
Provision for loan losses
    306,278       106,514                   412,792  
Non-interest income
    78,922       174,319       74,796       (117 )<